What’s wrong with the Warriors? Steve Kerr shares his thoughts

first_imgKlay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up!OAKLAND – This time, the Warriors did not hold a long film session or an intense scrimmage.Unlike after their 33-point loss last week to an Eastern Conference contender (Boston Celtics), Warriors coach Steve Kerr decided against punishing his team with that workload following their defeat on Sunday to the Western Conference’s worst team (Phoenix Suns). Therefore, …last_img read more

Epic run to put smiles on faces

first_imgDavid Grier and fellow ultra-distance runner Braam Malherbe ran across the Southern African coastline in 2008. (Image: Cipla Mile for Smiles blog) Adventurer David Grier during training for the 2010 Madagascar Challenge. (Image: Cipla Mile for Smiles) MEDIA CONTACTS • Ros Walsh Media Liaison Cipla Miles for Smiles +27 31 275 9700 or +27 82 920 3398 ros@ciplamedpro.co.za RELATED ARTICLES • South Africa reaches out to Haiti • South African leprosy survivors – no longer outcasts • Help for homeless children • The adventure starts hereBongani NkosiSouth African adventurer David Grier is braving torrential rain, extreme heat and blood-thirsty leeches in a world-first attempt to run the length of Madagascar during monsoon season. His motivation? To make a difference in the lives of children born with cleft lips and palates.Through this epic trek 50-year-old Grier is helping raise money for Operation Smile South Africa, an NGO which pays for affected children, and sometimes even adults, to have corrective surgery so they are able to smile.“This adventure is part of a commitment to make a difference in the lives of children in South Africa and the continent,” Grier said. “We will use the funds raised for children in South Africa and neighbouring countries.”The adventure, known as Madagascar Challenge 2010, is a continuation of the Cipla Miles for Smiles Challenge that saw Grier complete a 4 000km run across the Great Wall of China in 2006 with friend and fellow adventurer Braam Malherbe. The two adventurers also finished a 3 300km run along the Southern African coastline in 2008.But the Madagascar Challenge is by far the most difficult, the ultra long-distance runner said. It combines running, paddling and kite surfing – the latter two being new additions to Grier’s programme.He started his journey on 1 December in Nacala, on the north coast of Mozambique, and paddled 500km over 11 days to reach Majunga in northwest Madagascar. After this he travelled to the island’s southern tip to begin his quest.“I wanted to push the boundaries a bit to capture the imagination of the people following the event to prove that we can achieve what we set out to do,” Grier said of his decision to include paddling and kite surfing. The aim is to “bring awareness to the plight of these children so we can make a difference in their lives”.The public is being urged to make donations through the Miles for Smiles website. Presentations on Grier’s adventure will also be made to businesses in South Africa to generate further funds.More smiles for SAOperation Smile South Africa was set up just before Grier and Malherbe started their run in China in 2006, and has funded operations for more than 1 000 people since.Its first mission in Empangeni, KwaZulu-Natal province, in November 2006 provided free reconstructive surgery for 57 disadvantaged children and adults. In March 2008 the organisation funded operations for 31 similarly affected people in Swaziland and, by May of the same year, it went to Madagascar to do the same.Braving leeches, swamps and cyclonesIt’s hasn’t been smooth sailing for Grier and his support crew in Madagascar. The first challenge was paddling across the ocean and being hit by storms and a tornado.Running solo, he has covered more than 800km, and is currently passing through mostly rain-drenched forest in central Madagascar. The run itself has not been straightforward, with Grier having to swim across bulging rivers to reach nearby villages to spend the night. The next morning he’s up again to hit the mountains.Of the 800km he’s run, Grier still has “double that to do and more”. Weather permitting, Grier runs more than 40km a day.It’s been raining heavily for seven days in the central villages he’s passing through at the moment. In the north, where he’s headed, there’s the threat of extreme heat and cyclones.“The island is so diverse, the weather changes all the time. Down south is desolate and up to 40 degrees Celsius. In the north it’s going to be hot and then I am going to hit the cyclones. It’s going to get hectic,” he said.Grier’s health was at risk during his earlier days on the island. He fell sick for a month while adjusting to Madagascar’s water and has already lost 8kg. “… Now it’s the leeches and tropical fever that have hit me.”He said he’s very exhausted at the moment and feels like the parasites’ bites are draining his energy.His cameraman and media liaison manager, Nick Heygate, is recovering after being infected by leech bites in the forest. Heygate, who has been severely affected over the past few days, has had to walk about 40km unassisted out of the mountains.Grier had to endure running through deep sand in the south, and now he’s wading through “knee-deep swamp areas and red mud that just never dries”.Although he’s supported by Heygate, Grier doesn’t have enough logistical help “due to the funding difficulty”. Heygate is being assisted by two Malagasy men who’ve provided transport for him through the forests.“This has turned out to be a mammoth solo trip,” Grier said.He hopes to complete the adventure in April and will kite-surf back to South Africa from the Indian Ocean island.Man of many talentsSo what does Grier, the father of four who missed his daughter’s birthday party in December and celebrated his in unknown territory last Saturday, long for back in South Africa?“Just sit and appreciate my family and thank them for what they have had to endure unselfishly in order for me to be given the privilege of going out and making a difference,” he said.He also missed his eldest daughter’s wedding in Austria and said he would have loved spending Christmas and New Year’s Day home. “I will miss my wedding anniversary as well.”Grier is a man of many talents: he’s a celebrity chef, motivational speaker, photographer and published author. He has successfully summited Mount Kilimanjaro and completed numerous ultra-marathons, including the acclaimed Two Oceans Marathon (56km) and Comrades Marathon (90km) in South Africa.last_img read more

2010 Fifa World Cup: Football teams 2

first_imgTop South African club Kaizer Chiefs playing the UK’s Manchester United in the final of the Vodacom Cup at Loftus Stadium, a venue for the 2010 Fifa World Cup. Manchester United won by four goals to one.Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.  Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image {loadposition fifa}last_img read more

Westwood goes back-to-back at Sun City

first_img6 December 2011After a brilliant course record 10-under-par 62 in the third round, Lee Westwood played it safe, carding a final round one-over 73 on his way to a two-stroke victory in the 2011 Nedbank Golf Challenge at Sun City, North West province on Sunday.With the win, he joined Seve Ballesteros (1983/84), David Frost (1989/90), Nick Price (1997/98), Ernie Els (1999,2000), and Jim Furyk (2005/06) as the only back-to-back winners in the 31-year history of the event.Interviewed on the 18th hole’s green after being presented with the winner’s trophy by South Africa’s Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe, Westwood said: “I’ve been coming here a long time, this is the ninth time, and it’s special every time I come.‘Probably the best round I’ve ever played’“I love playing this course, and yesterday was probably the best round I’ve ever played. It set me up to play conservatively today. It’s very satisfying.”Questioned about his journey from being one of the world’s top players to being an also-ran, and then returning to the top (he is currently world number three), Westwood said: “It’s all right when things go well and you are top of the rankings, but when you drop to 270 you find out more about the real person.“So to get invited back here and win back-to-back titles is a bit special.“Yesterday was very special,” Westwood added. “I drove well and made a few putts, which you’ve got to do round any course when you make 10-under.”Four rounds under 70Robert Karlsson was the only player who managed to break 70 in every round. He did it, just, with rounds of 69, 69, 69, and 68, the best round of the final day, to finish on 13-under-par 275, alone in second place. That left the big Swede with a cheque of $660 000 (approximately R5.32-million), not quite the territory of Westwood’s $1.25-million (approximately R10.07-million), but a serious Christmas present nonetheless.Jason Dufner, in his first appearance at the Nedbank Challenge, drove well, but struggled a little with a cold putter. Despite that, he finished in a share of third with Graeme McDowell, on 11-under-par 277.The Northern Irishman was up and down throughout the event, scoring some brilliant birdies, but also dropping plenty of shots along the way.Four successive rounds of 70KT Kim looked like he really enjoyed his first experience of the Gary Player Country Club course at Sun City. He was steady throughout, carding four successive rounds of 70 to finish alone in fifth, on eight-under-par 280.In contrast, Charl Schwartzel looked a little weary, and that was reflected in his play. He enjoyed good rounds of 68 in the first and third rounds, but a 74 in the second round and 72 on the last day meant he never challenged beyond the opening 18 holes.World number one Luke Donald never really managed to get going and failed to break into the sixties, carding rounds of 70, 71, 70, and 72.Poor final roundMartin Kaymer, along with Westwood and Donald, one of three men in the field to have reached the world number one ranking, was undone by a poor final round of four-over-par 76. That left him in eighth spot, on four-under 284.The bottom four – Simon Dyson, Anders Hansen, Francesco Molinari, and Darren Clarke – were all undone by at least one poor round: Dyson carded a 75 in the third round, Hansen closed with a 77, Molinari shot 77 in round two, and Clarke finished with rounds of 76 and 78.SeniorsAmerican Mark Calcavecchia claimed the seniors’ title, finishing on nine-under-par 207 after rounds of 71, 69, and 67.Bernhard Langer and Ian Woosnam shared second on 208, with David Frost and Nick Price tied for fourth, five shots further back, on three-under 213.They were followed by Tom Lehman (218), Jeff Sluman (218), and Mark O’Meara (221).Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Big sisters are there to help

first_imgSince 2009, 753 high school girls have benefited from the services of 18twenty8.(Image: 18twenty8) Big sister to many, Refiloe Seseane.(Image: Cadine Pillay) The women-led team at 18twenty8.(Image: 18twenty8)MEDIA CONTACTS • Refiloe Seseane+2711 431 3440 Cadine PillayHow would the lives of many adult women in South Africa have turned out if they had been guided and mentored by older professional women during their school years?This ideology is what drives the team at non-profit organisation 18twenty8 to empower young women from disadvantaged backgrounds, giving them the opportunity to explore different life and career choices despite their circumstances.The call to helpFounded in 2008, 18twenty8 is the brainchild of leading South African actress and philanthropist, Refiloe Seseane, who created the organisation as a result of her own personal struggles growing up.Seseane found herself, at age 28, working as an investment analyst in Cape Town – unfulfilled and conflicted with her life choices. She made a life changing decision to move back to Johannesburg and review the decisions of the last ten years of her life – hence the name 18twenty8 – and so began her work in acting.She has since graced television screens across the country, appearing in popular soap opera Generations and more recently The Wild, among other productions.A separate calling however, that of helping others who may be in the same situation as she was when she was younger, was beginning to manifest itself in her everyday life.This led to her decision to focus on young women who needed guidance towards their ideal careers.“I had a willingness to give back to the community, and wanted to make a difference with my life,” she says.After she was honoured with the Youth in Philanthropy Award by the Inyathelo – South African Institute for Advancement in 2010, Seseane was chosen a year later as a member of the Young African Women Leaders’ Forum, hosted by US First Lady Michelle Obama.She is now a member of President Barack Obama’s 2012 Young African Leaders Initiative and was named one of 60 changemakers by Spark International, an Australian initiative for social entrepreneurs.Providing guidance18twently8’s financial assistance programme provides beneficiaries with a variety of tools like study loans and bursaries, as well as help during the job application process.The organisation also runs various workshops where young women are enlightened on self-empowerment, career development and education issues. Another workshop, called Green Girls, focuses on environmental awareness and conservation.However, the programme that Seseane is most proud of is the Big Sister Network, in which a team of older, more experienced professional women provide all-round mentorship for the young girls who join.“I always thought that if I had guidance and advice when I was a young girl, my life would have turned out differently and consequently so would my life choices,” says Seseane.“Parents sometimes cannot relate to what their children are going through, so they are not able to give the assurance or guidance that is needed.”The big sisters, of which Seseane is one, encourage the young women, who are mostly between the ages of 18 and 28, to view higher education as an attractive and necessary tool for their empowerment.To be considered for sponsorship or financial assistance, participants have to be enrolled in an academic institution and demonstrate leadership qualities, with a willingness to give back to their communities.“Through 18twenty8, we aim to groom successful generations of women, thereby continuing our collective dream,” says Seseane. “I would like to think that, in its own small way, 18twenty8 is closing the skills, gender and race differentials in South Africa.”Since 2009, 753 high school pupils have benefited from the services of the organisation, with 22 of them going through the Big Sister Network.Realising a dreamPalesa Phora (19) is one of three participants whose education is being sponsored by Deutsche Bank. She is currently in her first year of a bachelor’s degree in law and international Relations at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg.Recalling the events of the day she received the good news, Phora says she was so shocked, she cried.“My mother was relieved as she had been stressing about the financial burden of putting me through university.“I have no excuse to not pass as I have been given the tools I need to get through university. I still feel a great sense of joy when I think about it. I am so blessed!”Phora lived in Soweto with her grandparents for the first 10 years of her life, before moving to Benoni on the East Rand to stay with her mom, a single parent, and two younger sisters.“They really look up to me and in a way, they are my mentees,” she says, referring to her siblings.Despite her youth, Phora is already showing signs of determination. Through her education, which will later involve specialising in international law and foreign policy, she plans to use her degree to strengthen relations between South Africa and the rest of the world.“I want to be in Parliament one day, and I want to play a role in getting the youth active in politics and educating our citizens about their constitutional rights,” she asserts.“I just want to be very involved in getting South Africa to flourish because we do have the potential to be a great nation.”Phora started off with many goals and dreams for her future, but much like Seseane, she was not without uncertainty. In high school, her career thoughts ranged from journalism to business and later politics.“When I turned 16, my view of the world changed. I had dreams of being a very powerful and revolutionary woman and hoped to spread my influence throughout the world,” she says.Her hopes of fighting for women’s rights and representing the ‘universal woman’ have remained to this day.When she joined 18twenty8 in 2010, Phora suffered from a low self-esteem and a fear to venture out of her comfort zone. Through the organisation she received a mentor and attended events and workshops that helped her focus her ideas.“It exposed me to various women who had faced similar challenges as me but still managed to make a success of their lives, and that gave me hope,” says Phora.Mentoring is essentialPhora believes that South Africa’s education system pressures pupils into making big career decisions by choosing their matric subjects in grade 8. However, it does not necessarily expose them to the various options available to them beyond matric, nor does it equip them for the real world.For this reason, she says, mentors are a great help, because a mentor is usually someone who has travelled that path and is willing to guide you through it but still allows you to make your own decisions and learn your own lessons.“My mentor gives me invaluable advice regarding my degree and shows me how I will apply my skills in a work environment,” says Phora.“Our relationship is personal and well-rounded. She is someone I can call at any time of the day and can speak to about anything and everything.”The Big Sister Network has made a huge difference to how she carries herself and has made a positive impact on the decisions she makes on a daily basis, Phora says.She has advice of her own for girls in difficult situations: “Education is important. If you know better, you do better.”This is echoed by Seseane, who says young women should go to school and stay in school, as education is the key to everything that matters in life.“Stay focused and connect with one another, don’t doubt yourself,” she maintains.The team at 18twenty8 hope that one day the organisation becomes a national asset where people can share their views on education and mentorship.last_img read more

Cabinet meets to map out programme of action

first_img11 June 2014The first lekgotla (special meeting) of South Africa’s newly appointed Cabinet got under way in Pretoria on Tuesday, bringing together ministers, provincial premiers and other senior officials to map out the government’s programme of action for the year.The three-day meeting is being chaired by Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa in the absence of President Jacob Zuma, who was ordered by his doctors to take a few days’ rest following his hospitalisation for medical check-ups over the weekend.Zuma will outline the new administration’s programme for the year in his State of the Nation address to Parliament on Tuesday, 17 June.Speaking to reporters shortly before the start of Tuesday’s meeting, Minister in the Presidency Jeff Radebe said the main items on the agenda were the National Development Plan (NDP), the government’s medium-term strategic framework, and the ongoing mining strike on South Africa’s platinum belt.Radebe said the Cabinet ministers would look to the NDP as well as the African National Congress’s (ANC’s) election manifesto when drawing up the government’s programme of action.He added that the Cabinet would pay special attention to the issues of local government service delivery, unemployment, poverty and inequality“Our president is deeply concerned about the protests that have been happening around the country. We are going to make sure that we go into those areas with concrete responses.”Radebe said the long-running strike in South Africa’s platinum mining sector had had a debilitating effect on the economy.Members of the Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (Amcu) downed tools on 23 January, demanding a basic monthly salary of R12 500. So far, the industry and employees have lost billions of rands in earnings and forfeited wages.Two weeks ago, the government to set up a special task team to facilitate negotiations between the unions and mining companies. On Monday, however, Mineral Resources Minister Ngoako Ramatlhodi pulled the team out of the negotiations, putting the onus on the companies and unions to find common ground.Radebe said the impact of the strike showed that the mining sector still played a major role in the country’s economy. “We need to ensure that we encourage the resolutions of the strike so that we can begin with the implementation of the NDP.”Regarding President Zuma’s health, Radebe said the Deputy President was in constant touch with Zuma.“The President is improving. The Deputy President has reported to us that he is resting to ensure that he is ready for the State of the Nation address next week.”Zuma’s office said he had met with all his new ministers and deputy ministers in May, to go over policy priorities and his expectations of them.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Madison Plains’ greenhands recognized with ceremony, jackets

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The greenhand members of the Madison-Plains FFA chapter joined together on Saturday, October 1st to meet their officer team and receive their FFA Jackets.The cost of the jackets was partially paid for by the chapter as a gift for these members, for whom without the chapters future is unknown.Kameron Rinehart, Ohio Vice President at Large spoke to the greenhands and their parents about the benefits and importance of the organization. The officer team is excited to see its newest members accell and develop into tomorrow’s leaders.last_img read more

A New (Simpler?) Way to Control Flash with Microsoft Kinect

first_imgWhy You Love Online Quizzes Related Posts 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Tags:#hack#Hack of the Day klint finley We previously covered a method developed by BLITZ for controlling Flash and Canvas using Node.js. An organization has created what it hopes is a simpler way to control Flash-based interfaces using the Microsoft Kinect device. Open Exibits is an organization dedicated to creating open source interactive technology for students, museums and other educational organizations. It has built an open source module for controlling Flash with Kinect, and has demonstrated Kinect-control for Google Maps as well as some of Open Exhibits’ own projects.The module, still in alpha, is available here. Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

I could have been a footballer: Ranbir Kapoor

first_imgRanbir KapoorHe won over both the masses and the critics with his good looks and acting chops but while growing up Bollywood heartthrob Ranbir Kapoor had his heart set on being a football player.He let that dream go but the 28-year-old actor is now campaigning to make sports a part of school curriculums across the country with the ‘Fit India Movement’, a campaign launched by NDTV in collaboration with Nirmal Lifestyle.”I loved football, but I did not have anybody to guide me about making it a career. If Indian children have the coaches and the facilities that are available abroad, we will be world champions,” said Kapoor who is the brand ambassador of the campaign.The actor was in Delhi to launch the first phase of the campaign called ‘Marks For Sports’ and shared the stage with ace shooter Gagan Narang, billiards champion Pankaj Advani, Indian football captain Bhaichung Bhutia, boxing champion Vijender Singh and former cricketer Mansoor Ali Khan Pataudi.”It all begins at the school level and Marks for Sports is a campaign that will help discover the talent that our children have and sports teaches you so much. Other than making you fit, it teaches you discipline, motivation and team spirit,” said the actor who entered the venue on a bicycle.last_img read more