Electronics-waste bill passes House and Senate

first_imgOn March 23rd, the Vermont House of Representatives approved a broadly supported bill that would provide free and convenient recycling of electronic waste to residents, charities, schools, and small businesses in the state. S.77, which received tri-partisan support in the House and Senate, now makes its way to the Governor’s desk for the final step in the legislative process.”This is an incredible victory for consumers,” said Charity Carbine, environmental health advocate for the Vermont Public Interest Research Group (VPIRG). “Instead of storing old computers in their basements or waiting for once a year collection events, Vermonters will now be able to easily and responsibly recycle their e-waste for free.”Unlike traditional recycling programs, S.77 requires electronics manufacturers to share in the cost and responsibility of collecting and recycling their products. So-called “producer responsibility” programs are gaining momentum as states and municipalities acknowledge the role that manufacturers must have in the end-of-life management of their products. Vermont is the 21st state in the United States to pass this type of legislation for electronic waste. Europe, Canada and Asia also have producer responsibility laws for electronics as well as other products. Producer responsibility programs also provide powerful incentives for manufacturers to design their electronics to last longer and to exclude the toxic materials that make recycling so difficult and expensive.  The popular LCD TV is perhaps the “poster child” for how electronics are not designed with recycling in mind, because of both material selection and physical design. Inside a typical 40 inch LCD flat panel TV, there are 22 thin, fragile lamps containing mercury, which light the TV screen. The entire TV must be disassembled to get access to these bulbs, making replacement of bulbs and harvesting them in the recycling process difficult and expensive. (Source: Electronics Takeback Coalition)S.77 requires manufacturers of electronic goods to provide convenient collection options for Vermont consumers to drop off their televisions, computers and computer related equipment at no cost. The program is paid for by the manufacturers of those types of products. Vermonters will not see an increase in the price of their electronic products as a result of this legislation.  “In Vermont, municipalities, solid waste districts, and taxpayers bear the financial burden of grappling with e-waste”, said Jen Holliday, Environmental and Safety Compliance Manager for Chittenden Solid Waste District and coordinator for the Vermont Product Stewardship Council. “We have no control on how these products are designed, manufactured, marketed and sold, but ultimately it is local government that is left with trying to capture and recycle these products when they are being discarded. This legislation changes that model and provides the consumer with a convenient and consistent state-wide collection system that we lack today.” Rapid advances in technology and the emergence of new electronic gadgets make the electronics the fastest growing waste stream in the United States. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates  that in 2007, the US generated over 3 million TONS of e-waste. Approximately 1.5 million pounds of discarded electronics were collected in Vermont in 2008 alone. Source: CSWD. 3.26.2010###last_img read more

Lakers unveil new Kobe Bryant-themed uniforms, designed by Kobe Bryant

first_imgThe Lakers retired both of Bryant’s jersey numbers at a halftime ceremony on Dec. 18.“It’s got his own nice little touches,” Walton said. “I always thought he did a really good job, he was always heavily involved in the design with his own shoe and I have always been a fan of those.“I think he does a really nice job with the subtleties of the jersey that was put together. I think it will be fun for the team and the fans.”The uniform is the last of five Lakers looks to be unveiled by Nike.RELATED: More on the reaction to the new Lakers uniform. The latest Lakers jersey to be unveiled has Kobe Bryant’s print all over it.Specifically, it has snake print.Bryant designed the Lakers “City Edition” jerseys in collaboration with Nike, and the result was a black jersey with a snakeskin effect, honoring his “Black Mamba” persona, and shadowbox numbers – a callback to Bryant’s early seasons with the Lakers. The Lakers will first wear the jerseys on Jan. 26 in Chicago, and on seven subsequent occasions before the end of the regular season.Coach Luke Walton first saw an early version of the design months ago and called the look “awesome.” The uniforms are complete with unique touches that honor Bryant, including the subtle inclusion of Nos. 8 and 24 under the flap of each leg of the shorts.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more