Giants-Pirates preview: Brandon Belt’s strike zone stirs controversy again

first_imgPITTSBURGH — It’s no surprise when a big event in the nation’s capital sparks a debate around the country and that’s exactly what happened on Thursday.The events in Washington, D.C., did little to move people from one side of the aisle to the other as most have had their minds made up on this subject for quite some time.We’re talking, of course, about whether Brandon Belt should do more to protect against called third strikes.Belt was rung up twice by home plate umpire Ryan Additon in the …last_img read more

Ignoring Networks at Your Professional Peril

first_imgAuthor: Jim LangcusterThis article was originally published Tuesday August 27, 2013 on the Military Families Learning Network blog.This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Hi, AleX:You have always been a dedicated professional. Your work has always been about serving your clients, building one-on-one relationships grounded in trust.British Coffeehouses in the 17th century provided raucous places where ideas could be freely discussed and exchanged.It’s reflected in the way you regard network literacy. Admit it, AleX: Deep in the back of your mind, you still harbor this fear that any significant investment in social media will work to dilute these close relationships.That’s understandable. Just be warned: By ignoring emerging social networks, you’re imperiling your professional future.It’s important for you to come to terms with that fact, AleX.Granted, a handful of CEOs pointing to a clutch of online infographics, some specious at best, stubbornly maintain that networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter are not only eroding the minds of young people but also costing the economy some $650 billion a year.Don’t buy into it, Alex.Truth is, the benefits of social networking have been apparent for a long time, a very long time — in fact, for as long as 500 years.Rudimentary forms of social networking have been traced as far back as 17th century English coffeehouses, raucous places in which people shared ideas freely and openly and that bore an uncanny resemblance to the emerging social media platforms of the 21st century.Many of the exchanges that grew out of these boisterous meeting places provided the basis for intellectual and material advances that have benefited countless millions of people and that are still being felt today, almost half a millennium later — a theme explored by famed science and technology writer Tom Standage in a recent article in the New York Times titled “Social Networking in the 1600s.”Proponents of conventional wisdom of the day derided these coffeehouses as venues of idle chitchat, much as their 21st century counterparts do with social media today.To be sure, lots of idle chitchat and gossip occurred in these haunts. Yet, something remarkable happened too. In addition to consuming copious amounts of coffee and indulging in idle gossip, not a few of these coffeehouse patrons read and shared the insights from the latest pamphlets and news sheets, many of which dealt with the prevailing scientific, literary, political and commercial themes of the day.In a diary entry dated in November, 1633, renowned diarist Samuel Pepys observed that discussion covered such diverse topics as how to store beer, the implications of a certain type of nautical weapon, and speculations about the outcome of an upcoming trial.Conventional academic leaders of the day heaped scorn on the low caliber of discourse that purportedly prevailed in these coffeehouses.“Why doth solid and serious learning decline, and few or none follow it now in the university,” Oxford academic Anthony Wood plaintively asked. “Answer: Because of Coffee Houses, where they spend all their time.”They were misinformed. Lots of serious discussion and learning ensued in these coffeehouses.Borrowing Standage’s picturesque term, these coffeehouses turned out to be “crucibles of creativity” — environments in which people representing diverse backgrounds and perspectives met and exchanged ideas. Many of these ideas, in the course of meeting and mating, provided the basis for new ways of thinking, which, in turn, spawned new concepts and inventions. Some ended up changing the course of history.One of the more noteworthy examples of coffeehouse exchanges: Lloyd’s of London, the world-renowned insurance firm, which grew out of Edward Lloyd’s coffeehouse, a popular haunt of ship captains, ship owners and maritime traders.One coffeehouse served as the nursery of modern economics: Adam Smith passed early drafts of “The Wealth of nations” among his acquaintances at the Cockspur Street coffeehouse, where many Scottish artists and intellectuals of his time gathered.Yet, why should we be surprised by this? For his part, Standage cites modern research demonstrating that students learn more effectively when they are interacting with other learners.Coffeehouses provided 17th century entrepreneurs, journalists, scientists and philosophers with highly generative, open-source platforms — foundations on which many of the predominant ideas, concepts and technologies of the modern era took form.This brings us back to the present-day, AleX. As Standage stresses in his article, the emerging social media platforms of the 21st century are providing us with the same kinds of highly generative platforms — places where people, in the course of exchanging ideas and sparking new ones, have the potential of improving the lives of countless millions of people for generations to come.Under the circumstances, is there any reason why you shouldn’t join into this conversation, AleX? This is part of the “Hi, AleX” series — advice to AleX NetLit about enhancing her levels of network literacy through day-to-day personal and professional social networking. AleX Netlit is a fictional persona created by Network Literacy Community of Practice to serve as a guide to Military Families Service professionals, Cooperative Extension educators and others seeking to learn more about using online networks in their work.More about Alex NetLitlast_img read more

Restrictions in parts of Kashmir ahead of Burhan Wani’s death anniversary

first_imgAuthorities imposed restrictions in parts of Kashmir on Saturday as a precautionary measure to maintain law and order on the eve of the second death anniversary of Hizbul Mujahideen commander Burhan Wani, even as a strike called by separatists evoked mixed response in the Valley. Restrictions have been imposed in Tral township, in south Kashmir’s Pulwama district, and in the Nowhatta and Maisuma police station areas of Srinagar — the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir, a police official said. He said the curbs have been imposed as a precautionary measure to maintain law and order and to avoid any untoward incident. Wani, a resident of Tral, was killed in an encounter with security forces in the Kokernag area of south Kashmir’s Anantnag district on July 8, 2016. His killing triggered massive protests and prolonged period of curfews and shutdowns across the Valley. As many as 85 people were killed and thousand others were injured in clashes between security forces and protesters over four months. The official said security forces have been deployed in strength at sensitive places across the Valley. Meanwhile, the strike called by separatists against the shifting of Asiya Andrabi, the chief of radical women’s outfit Dukhtaran-e-Millat (DeM), to Delhi by the National Investigation Agency (NIA), evoked mixed response in the Valley today. The separatists, under the banner of Joint Resistance Leadership (JRL), had on Friday called for a strike to protest the shifting of Andrabi and her colleagues. The JRL — comprising Syed Ali Shah Geelani, Mirwaiz Umar Farooq and Yasin Malik — appealed to the people to “observe a complete shutdown and maintain civil curfew”.While shops and other establishments were shut in the city centre Lal Chowk here, business continued as usual in other areas of the city, the official said. He said public transport was sparse, but private cars, cabs and auto-rickshaws were plying in many areas of the city. The official said similar reports of a mixed response to the strike were received from other district headquarters of the Valley. Cracking a whip on separatist leaders ahead of Wani’s death anniversary, the police had on Friday detained Malik in a police station here, while Mirwaiz was put under house arrest. Geelani continued to remain under house detention.last_img read more