Best of Windies still to come, says Moseley

first_imgKOLKATA, India (CMC):West Indies Women assistant coach Ezra Moseley believes the best is yet to come from the Caribbean side’s batting, and hopes it can click in tomorrow’s final of the Women’s Twenty20 World Cup against nemesis Australia.Playing in Thursday’s semi-final against New Zealand Women in Mumbai, West Indies Women rattled up 143 for six, and then bowled superbly to defend the total and come away with a six-run win.Moseley said based on the quality in the batting unit, West Indies Women had the ability to score in excess of 143.”I’m not certain that our batting has really clicked yet. We are better than 140 on a good pitch,” the former West Indies fast bowler said.”And I am hoping that Deandra (Dottin) and the captain (Stafanie Taylor) and the others could really chip in and give us a big total in the final that we can defend if we bat first.”Taylor has been the most consistent batsmen in the series with scores of 40, 40, 35, 47 and 25 in her five innings in the tournament.INCONSISTENT BATTINGThe remainder of the batting unit has been inconsistent, however, and Britney Cooper’s career-best 61 in the semi-final was the first half-century in the tournament for the Windies Women.Moseley said Cooper had played well despite carrying a slight niggle.”She played well. The coach Vasbert Drakes said he was going to send her at number three and she really batted well, although she was carrying a slight side strain,” Moseley noted.The semi-final win saw the Windies Women finally break their jinx and reach the final of a Twenty20 World Cup for the first time, after bowing out at the final-four stage at the previous three tournaments.Moseley said Thursday’s win had been inspired by Cooper’s half-century coupled with tenacious bowling.”Britney Cooper has not really done a lot with the bat in this series. She came good … and it was good to see but I thought (with) the bowling, most of them kept their nerves and did the business for West Indies.”last_img read more

Is “fat” a four-letter word?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Is fat a bad word? Not necessarily. Simply put, fat is just the body’s storage form of energy. If an animal consumes more energy than it uses, the excess calories will be stored as fat — money in the bank to be used in an energy shortage (think cows calving in late winter). Fat also imparts flavor to food (like a T-bone steak) but it also adds calories. So managing fat can be a delicate issue in the cattle business.Presently, eating quality of beef is estimated to a large degree by the amount of marbling (intramuscular fat) that it contains. Tenderness is also important but is generally a function of age (younger is better). Marbling generally increases after the animal attains some maturity and external fattening has occurred. External fat is frequently used as an indication of when cattle will have enough marbling to grade choice or prime. I know what you are thinking — why don’t we just measure marbling? We’re getting to that with ultrasound technology and it would allow us to avoid over finishing (high yield grades) of fed cattle. Ideally, marbling would occur in feedlot cattle with very little external fat being present. We would like to have Choice and Prime quality grades with yield grades of 2 or 3 for our fed cattle. But . . . If we bred cattle to meet this criterion, what would it mean to the beef cow herd? Don’t ever take fleshing ability away from the brood cow herd! It will have a negative effect on reproduction.It is important to understand how cattle fatten so that we can manage them accordingly. Fat is “laid down” from front to back and top to bottom. The fore ribs and spinous processes are covered first then the fat cover continues backward and downward. That’s why folks look for cod fat (in the scrotal area) as an indicator of when cattle are finished. It is the last place to fatten. Loss of body fat happens in reverse order. Fat cover is the basis for condition scoring in beef cattle.Body condition has a definite impact on reproductive performance. Cows should generally be at a Body Condition Score (BCS) of five at the beginning of the breeding season. A cow with a BCS of 5 will have some fat reserves, with fat cover over all the ribs. As cows lose condition (in the reverse order that it was put on) a BCS 5 would become a BCS 4 when they lose condition so there is no cover over the last two ribs. This would mean that the cow has very marginal energy reserves for good reproductive performance. If this loss of condition (fat reserves) continues so that you can see the foreribs (BCS 3), then you have a real problem. Conception rates will suffer.Loss of condition generally happens after calving when dietary energy needs have increased dramatically and feed supplied isn’t meeting those needs. The cow has to “withdraw, from the bank” to meet her nutritional needs. It is important that some energy reserves are available.And what about the herd bulls(s)? We need some energy reserves so that bulls can stay active during the breeding season but … bulls are athletes. They should have muscling, sound feet and legs and be able to sire a large number of calves in a short period of time. At least that is what we say we want but then we frequently buy young, fat bulls that look great at the start of the breeding season and are a wreck before the season is over.Why does this happen? Probably because we confuse fat with muscling. We are looking at thickness as a sign of muscling but it could just be a layer of fat. Fat can “plaster over” thin-muscled cattle. Fat doesn’t move but muscles will “ripple”. Watch the animals as they move. Observe the hindquarters and shoulders. Remember, “if it ain’t movin’, it ain’t muscle!”So managing fat (or condition) is important in the cattle business, especially in the cowherd for optimum reproduction. Fat is important — both too much or too little can be a problem. Astute producers recognize the importance of efficient cattle that can maintain adequate energy reserves without wasting feed resources.last_img read more

Showtime’s YouTube Gambit: Dexter And Homeland For Free

first_imgfruzsina eordogh Tags:#Internet TV#marketing#web The entire season 7 premiere of Dexter is on YouTube – and no, it’s not a pirated copy. Showtime posted the entire episode, as well as the season 2 premiere of Homeland. A capitulation to pirates? No, an effort to entice viewers to pay for premium television service.Bundled cable channels occasionally host episodes of their shows online, either through the video player on their site or through Hulu, but premium channels like HBO and Showtime have shied away from offering their content online. Until now. Showtime is not running ads with its YouTube content, indicating that the free online distribution is, indeed, a marketing ploy.Cable networks started experimenting with offering their content online last year. Fox led the charge in an unprecedented digital-first showing of Zooey Deschanel’s vehicle New Girl before the show aired on cable. The “sneak peak barrage” worked wonders for buzz, leading the network to try again this year with Mindy Kaling’s The Mindy Project. Fox’s success with digital premiers prompted NBC to try the same approach with Smash in January of this year, and again with its new fall shows Revolution and The New Normal. Showtime’s offering is available only to YouTube users in the U.S.This digital strategy seems to be successful at expanding the audience for new shows, but will it work for shows going into their 7th season?  So far, the answer appears to be a tentative yes. More than 40,000 people have tuned in since the Dexter episode was posted on the Showtime YouTube channel last night, meaning 40,000 people without Showtime didn’t pirate the episode. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more