McCormick wins in run-off

first_imgJunior Pat McCormick and sophomore Brett Rocheleau won the election for student body president and vice president after capturing 64 percent of the vote in Thursday’s runoff, Judicial Council president Marcelo Perez said. McCormick and Rocheleau defeated junior James Ward and freshman Heather Eaton in the runoff election. “It was a very normal turnout, with just a little over 3,000 students voting,” Perez said. “No more or no less than usual.” McCormick, who currently serves as the chair of the Senate Social Concerns Committee, said he looks forward to working toward a smooth transition with current student body president Catherine Soler and vice president Andrew Bell. “We want to build on the extraordinary foundation their leadership has built for student government,” he said. The ticket’s top priority is going to be trying to connect to students in all areas of their life, McCormick said. “We want to try to transform student government as a way of amplifying students’ voices and responding to issues that students care about,” he said. “It is our hope that we can build a student government that allows students to chart their own course for the future of Notre Dame.” McCormick said they hope to make student government more about students by creating a committee for constituent services. “Ultimately, moral conscience is at the core of all of our ideas,” he said. Rocheleau, who was out of town when the polls closed at 8 p.m., received the results of the election via Skype. “I’m very excited and I wish I was there,” he said. “We’re both looking forward to a great year.”  Ward and Eaton received 35.9 percent of the vote in the runoff. Eaton said the ticket was excited to have made it to this point in the election. “It’s definitely something to cross off the bucket list,” Eaton said. “I just want to thank everyone who has supported us. It’s been a great run.” Ward said he hopes to remain involved with student government despite the loss. “I’m thinking about jumping into the policy side of things,” he said. “It definitely opens up a lot of opportunities.” McCormick said he and Rocheleau are looking forward to taking office April 1. “We have high hopes for Notre Dame and the role that Notre Dame can play in higher education,” McCormick said. “We want to help students realize those hopes for our school.”last_img read more

Senators Urge Administration to Fund Great Lakes Coastal Study

first_imgU.S. Senators Rob Portman, co-Chair of the Senate Great Lakes Task Force, and Task Force member Sherrod Brown, sent a letter to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget as well as the Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army Corps requesting funding for a Great Lakes coastal resiliency study in the President’s FY 2019 budget request.Great Lakes Task Force co-Chair Debbie Stabenow, Vice Chair Amy Klobuchar and members Tammy Baldwin, Dick Durbin, Bob Casey, Tammy Duckworth, Kirsten Gillibrand, Chuck Schumer, Tina Smith, and Gary Peters also signed the letter.“The Great Lakes coastline faces numerous threats, such as lake level fluctuations, erosion, flooding, nutrient runoff, and aging infrastructure. It is important to ensure that the Great Lakes’ 5,200-mile coastline is protected, as 4.2 million people live within two miles of a Great Lakes coastline. The coastline is also imperative to a robust economy and tourism industry in the Great Lakes, as it includes 60 commercial harbors moving over 123 million tons of cargo annually,” wrote the Senators.“We appreciate the Corps’ consultation with the Great Lakes states in proposing this study, as we fully intend for this study to be used to implement projects that will result in a more resilient coastline throughout the Great Lakes and a more strategic expenditure of state and federal funds.”“The Great Lakes Commission knows that only by working together can the states, the federal government and local communities best protect our 5,200-mile coastline. That’s why a comprehensive Great Lakes Coastal Resiliency Study, developed alongside the states, is necessary,” said John Linc Stine, chair of the Great Lakes Commission and Commissioner of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency.A PDF of the letter can be found here.last_img read more