Kernals on the Cob (A Crop Tour Parody)

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Get ready for this year’s I-75/I-71 Ohio Crop Tour, presented by AgroLiquid, by checking out this crop tour parody song written by Matt Reese and Ty Higgins!Lyrics: Every year we hit the road to look at lots of crops Husking ears and counting pods At every single stop If there is mud caked on our boots It’s never quite as fun But rain or shine we’ll be just fine And work til the jobs done.Counting kernals on the cob How’d I get this crazy job? Hit the road just before dawn Spend the day in the hot sun Looking for insects and different kinds of Leaf disease. I’ll sample the corn, cause I have to pee.We stop for doughnuts and ice cream A few times along the way Swapping tall tales of short corn We saw throughout the day We crisscross the interstate Back roads are all we drive Sure hope Bart fixed those truck breaks So we make it back alive.Hours in the crop tour van Sitting by a sweaty man Beans and corn and corn and beans Are the only things I’ve seen Found some white mold and some nitrogen deficiency Hey I’ll check the corn, I have to pee No I mean it guys I do have to peelast_img read more

How to Better Solve Problems

first_imgIf you are solving a problem, you first have to define the problem. What is it that’s wrong? What needs to change? What new result do you need to produce? Defining your problem is the critical first step of problem solving.But the second step is just as important. It’s identifying all of your options.Too Few OptionsOne of the reasons that resourcefulness is critical to success is that overcoming all of the challenges you encounter requires ideas.A lot of people find one solution to a problem and decide that is the only way the problem might be solved. Then they get hooked on that idea, usually the most obvious idea and the one that will make a lot of people unhappy.Most people identify two possible ways a problem might be solved. You can choose option 1 or option 2. Both options aren’t ideal, but at least it is a choice. But for most problems, there are far more that two options. But it’s work to identify them.By identifying a few ideas, none that are ideal, you don’t do the real work of problem solving.The Real WorkThe real work of solving problems is identifying all of the options available. You brainstorm; no idea is too wild, nothing’s off the table.You ask yourself what else is possible? Is there a substitution that can be made, a way to avoid solving the problem altogether? Is there a solution that means that you look for a different result than you were when you originally set out to solve the problem? Is there a new outcome that will leapfrog your present results?A Quick ExampleRight now I am helping to guide a startup Nano-technology firm to market. Most of the problems we encounter are complicated, but they generally revolve around resources. Most of the problems are framed up as a choice between A or B, neither of which is ever ideal.Instead of choosing between A or B, we have decided to spend more time identifying options. In one case, we thought we had two options, but it turns out that we have five options—one of which was never considered but eliminates any negative outcome. Even better, someone else has agreed to do it for us. We would have never gotten to that idea if we stopped at a choice between two ideas.Defining a problem is easy. Creating more than a few options to solve that problem is more challenging. But the more work you do here, the better your solution.QuestionsHow often do you solve problems by choosing the lesser of two evils?What problem are you trying to solve now?How many options have you identified?How many of those options allow you to do something very different than you first imagined?Who can you get to help you identify more options?last_img read more

Deakin to Host Twilight Touch Weekend

first_imgMatches will begin in the twilight hours and teams will compete for a share in the prize money. It is expected that eight teams will hotly contest each of the men’s, women’s and mixed divisions. Pool games will tap-off from 2pm on Saturday 22 August 2009 with the semi-finals and final held on Sunday 23 August 2009.  Lock in this weekend and get your team together. Places are limited so to avoid disappointment contact ACT Touch on 6212 2880 or visit our website (www.acttouch.com.au) to secure your spot for the Twilight Touch Weekend.last_img read more

Ohio State’s Cardale Jones Claims He’s Transferring To Akron, Then Claims “May Fools”

first_imgCardale Jones says thank you to OSU in joke on twitter for "May fools".Cardale Jones May Fools 5Typically, people use April 1st as the date to troll their friends with some kind of unbelievable joke. Ohio State quarterback Cardale Jones apparently celebrates the holiday a month late. Friday, Jones took to Twitter to claim that he is transferring to Akron after a “rough decision” on his part.After a few minutes, he came clean, joking that he’d pulled a “May Fools” joke on everyone.It was a rough decision but I think it’s best for me, like to thank OSU for this amazing opportunity but my time here has came to an end— Cardale Jones (@CJ12_) May 1, 2015#NewBeginning #FreshStart— Cardale Jones (@CJ12_) May 1, 2015#ZipNation— Cardale Jones (@CJ12_) May 1, 2015MAY FOOLS— Cardale Jones (@CJ12_) May 1, 2015Jones tried to sell the joke hard, even changing his Twitter bio and background page to reflect his new team.Screen Shot 2015-05-01 at 2.29.37 PMJones is probably the frontrunner for the starting job at Ohio State, so this would have been a shocker. Instead, it was merely some Friday afternoon entertainment.last_img read more

Duke of Cambridge And Prince Harry Take Part In DIY SOS The

first_imgThe Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry joined the BBC’s DIY SOS team in Manchester as they helped turn a street scattered with derelict houses into liveable homes for ex-service personnel.Prince William takes part in DIY SOS The Big Build: Veteran’s SpecialCredit/Copyright: DukeAndDuchessOfCambridge.orgOver the past few weeks The Big Build: Veteran’s Special have been renovating eight buildings, streetscaped an entire street and rejuvenating the façade of 62 houses to create the basis of a new mixed community for service personnel making the transition to civilian life, as well as for long-standing residents.The re-development has also created a support centre on the street, run by Walking with the Wounded and the Royal British Legion to assist ex-servicemen and women with retraining and on-site support for those who have been injured – mentally or physically – while in the Armed Forces.Prince Harry takes part in DIY SOS The Big Build: Veteran’s SpecialCredit/Copyright: www.princehenryofwales.org/Servicemen and women who have made great personal sacrifices for our country deserve healthy, dignified, and successful post-military lives. Yet ex-service personnel account for a large percentage of the homeless in Britain. At the same time, there are currently over half a million empty properties in England. For this project, 26 houses out of the 64 on two streets have been gifted to Haig Housing, which runs housing schemes specifically for veterans.As the memory of conflicts fade and public focus beings to move elsewhere both The Duke and Prince Harry will continue to draw attention to the ongoing challenges facing service personnel making the transition to civilian life. That can include offering support with accommodation, employment or health issues.During the visit, The Princes joined the DIY SOS team of builders and hundreds of volunteers to help with the final stages of the build. They worked alongside other ex-servicemen and women, who are also taking part in the renovation work as they develop their skills and re-train into a new trade.The Duke and Prince Harry also met the street’s existing residents and members of all the organisations who have contributed to BBC’s DIY SOS team’s most ambitious project to date.The DIY SOS Big Build: Veteran’s special will be aired on BBC One at 9pm on 14th and 21st October 2015.Source:DukeAndDuchessOfCambridge.orglast_img read more

Whats Your Story – A Canada 2017 Yearbook

first_imgOTTAWA, May 1, 2017 /CNW/ – CBC/Radio-Canada invites Canadians to participate in the creation of a special, bilingual project to mark Canada’s 150th anniversary. WHAT’S YOUR STORY? – A CANADA 2017 YEARBOOK, to be published in both official languages as a single edition in the fall of 2017, will be a fascinating collection of short stories from Canadians across the country – a snapshot of the diverse people, places, things and events that tell a story of who we are now, and where we are headed together as a nation.Starting today, we are giving Canadians a digital space to share their personal stories and memories (in text or video format, accompanied by photos) that define what it means to be a part of this country at this time in our history.Are there any people or places in Canada that inspire you?Was there a single moment you felt proud to be Canadian?If you could change one thing about Canada – what would it be?Are you working on a special project that will make Canada a better place to live? Tell us your story at cbc.ca/whatsyourstoryCBC/Radio-Canada will select some of the most compelling stories to be included in the yearbook by July 15, 2017, and will feature many of these submissions online at cbc.ca/2017 until November 30, 2017.Hardcover bilingual editions of WHAT’S YOUR STORY? – A CANADA 2017 YEARBOOK will be available to the public in select bookstores in time for the holiday season. A downloadable digital edition will also be available for free to all Canadians.“Canadians have great stories to tell; unique perspectives and challenging points of view,” said Hubert T. Lacroix, President and CEO of CBC/Radio-Canada. “We hope this project will inspire Canadians from coast to coast to coast to share experiences and ideas, learn more from each other and engage in their communities.”WHAT’S YOUR STORY? – A CANADA 2017 YEARBOOK is being published by CBC/Radio-Canada with Mosaic Press, one of Canada’s leading independent publishers, multicultural in its scope, and concerned with the publication of works that reflect the Canadian ethnic mosaic.Publication and distribution details will be announced at a later date.About CBC/Radio-CanadaCBC/Radio-Canada is Canada’s national public broadcaster and one of its largest cultural institutions. We are Canada’s trusted source of news, information and Canadian entertainment. Deeply rooted in communities all across the country, CBC/Radio-Canada offers diverse content in English, French and eight Indigenous languages. We also provide international news and information from a uniquely Canadian perspective. In 2017, CBC/Radio-Canada will at the heart of the celebrations and conversations with special 2017-themed multiplatform programming and events across Canada. Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Twitter Facebooklast_img read more

CoucheTard hasnt given up hope of selling cannabis in Western Canada CEO

first_imgMONTREAL – Alimentation Couche-Tard Inc. hasn’t given up hope of selling cannabis as some Western Canadian provinces turn to the private sector for over-the-counter sales, the convenience store operator’s CEO said Tuesday.Brian Hannasch said the large convenience store chain, which operates as Circle K outside Quebec, has a proven track record of selling age-restricted products like cigarettes and beer.“We welcome the opportunity to work with one of the provinces here in Canada to demonstrate we can be a good partner in the space,” he said during a conference call about its second-quarter results.“And we are open to other formats that in the near term meet the concerns of these regulators.”While most provinces plan to sell marijuana in government-owned stores, Alberta, British Columbia and Manitoba are looking at partnering with the private sector.Hannasch told analysts that he anticipates more markets around the world opening to cannabis sales.His comments came in response to an analyst’s questions after he discussed Couche-Tard’s strong quarterly results.The Quebec-based retailer’s earnings surged 35 per cent to a record US$435.3 million in its latest quarter as the CST Brands acquisition more than offset the negative impact of hurricanes in the U.S. south.The company, which reports in U.S. dollars, said it earned 76 cents per diluted share in the second quarter of its fiscal year, up from 57 cents or $321.5 million a year earlier.He said the strong performance was realized despite challenges from hurricane Harvey in Texas and hurricane Irma in the southeast United States.“At one point we had over 1,300 of our stores closed during the storms, including every store at one time in our Florida market,” he said.No employees were injured but the company took a $4.8-million financial hit from the loss of sales, incremental expenses to replace inventories and cleaning up costs.Excluding one-time charges, Couche-Tard (TSX:ATD.B) earned $458 million or 80 cents per share for the three months ended Oct. 15. That compared to $328 million or 58 cents per share in the prior year.Analysts expected Couche-Tard would report 71 cents per share in adjusted profits, according to analyst Derek Dley of Canaccord Genuity.“This was notably impressive as the company was unfavourably impacted by numerous store closures related to Hurricanes Harvey and Irma during the quarter,” he wrote in a report.Revenues were $12.1 billion, up 44 per cent from $8.44 billion in the second quarter of fiscal 2017.Hannasch said the company took a hit that likely equalled more than one per cent of sales because of distribution problems in Quebec following the acquisitions of Esso and Ultramar.“We underestimated the impact of adding both these networks to our Quebec distribution centre and we had significant supply disruptions.”Hannasch said the U.S. industry faces challenges as shoppers, particularly low-income consumers, reduce the number of automobile trips that spawn convenience store sales.“Despite an eight-year bull run in the stock market, real wage growth in much of our geographies have been fairly anaemic,” he said.In Canada, Couche-Tard faces minimum wage increases in Ontario and Alberta that is forcing it to become more efficient and reduce costs, in part, through the use of new technology, said chief financial officer Claude Tessier.Couche-Tard’s shares hit a 52-week high of C$66.53 in early Tuesday trading but closed up just 49 cents to C$64.75.last_img read more

Feds provide more details on revisions to controversial tax proposals

first_imgOTTAWA – The federal government released more details Wednesday on changes to its controversial tax proposals in hopes of further addressing deep concerns over reforms that have angered the small-business community.The Liberals unveiled tweaks to a proposal that, as of Jan. 1, would tighten existing rules enabling small-business owners to lower their tax burden by sharing some of their earnings with family members — a practice known as income sprinkling.The changes are designed to make it more difficult for owners to share their income with relatives who do not make significant contributions to their companies.“For those that are passing income to family members that aren’t involved in the business, it’s clear that that’s no longer going to be considered appropriate,” said federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau, who insisted the changes would create new hurdles for about 45,000 business owners, less than three per cent of Canada’s total.The government contends those owners have been using incorporation of their small businesses to gain an unfair tax advantage.“More than 97 per cent of businesses will have absolutely no change in their situation,” Morneau said.The reform was among several adjustments the government made to a tax-reform package that, following its release last summer, triggered an onslaught of complaints from doctors, lawyers, accountants, tax experts, farmers, premiers and even some Liberal backbenchers.Vocal opponents have spent months criticizing the proposals, contending they would hurt the very middle class the Trudeau government claimed to be trying to help.Earlier Wednesday, the Senate finance committee urged the government to abandon its controversial tax proposals — or at the very least delay their implementation for one year, until 2019.The committee — five Conservatives, five independents and two Independent Liberals — made the demand after studying the potential impacts of the entire package of proposals. Two senators on the committee, both of whom were appointed by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, declined to support the call for the whole tax plan to be withdrawn.The government insisted that Wednesday’s revisions to the income-sprinkling rules contain clear, simple tests — including whether a family member has made a substantial capital investment in the business or meets minimum age and number of hours worked requirements — to determine whether a relative has made a meaningful contribution to the business.The revisions follow complaints from business groups that the initial plan to apply an undefined “reasonableness test” to determine when income sprinkling would be allowed was too uncertain and would add an unnecessary bookkeeping burden on businesses.Initially, the government expected the income sprinkling reform to bring in another $250 million per year to federal coffers, but that’s been revised to $220 million per year by 2022-23.A coalition of industry associations, including a national group representing small and medium-sized businesses, has criticized Ottawa for waiting until a couple of weeks before the end of the year to provide clarity on the tax changes, which will take effect on Jan. 1, 2018.On Wednesday, political opponents warned the changes will force small business owners to scramble over the holiday period to arrange their affairs. They also criticized Morneau’s decision to release the revisions right before the Christmas break with little chance for proper debate.Tory MP Pierre Poilievre called the announcement a “complicated web of rules” that would burden small business owners and could cost the government more in lawyers fees than it will bring in.But Morneau said owners will have all of next year to adjust to the changes before having to file their 2018 tax returns.One tax expert says people who are not exempt from the new rules will still face subjective, complicated compliance rules. And because of this, Jan. 1, 2018, will still be a “hard deadline” for them to arrange their affairs.“We still have some significant concerns around the complexity,” said Bruce Ball, vice-president of tax for the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada.The political and business-sector backlash over Morneau’s suite of tax proposals has dogged the finance minister for months. Wednesday’s Senate recommendations added to the pressure.The criticism has forced Morneau to back away from some elements of the package.In hope of soothing its critics, the government announced in October it would abandon an element of the income-sprinkling proposal that would have limited access to the lifetime capital gains exemption. Morneau said he made the change to avoid unintended negative impacts on the intergenerational transfer of family businesses, like farms.He also narrowed the scope of his proposal on passive-investment income — what some believe is the most contentious piece of the government’s tax-reform plan — so that only about three per cent of the most wealthy private corporations will have to pay higher taxes.Morneau said the goal of the change was to enable small business owners to sock away money inside their corporations for future business-related needs, while still targeting wealthy people who use their corporate structures purely as a way to reduce their taxes. The government is to release draft legislation on this element as part of next year’s budget.Morneau also dropped altogether a proposal related to converting income into capital gains, which had raised concerns, particularly among those in the agricultural community, that it would become too costly to pass family businesses on to the next generation.After last fall’s outcry, the government also announced it would revive a 2015 campaign promise to cut taxes for all small businesses. Trudeau promised to gradually trim the small-business tax rate to nine per cent by 2019, down from its current level of 10.5 per cent.last_img read more

Oilsands tech touted for pipeline capacity boost still years from deployment

first_imgCALGARY – Two years after a blue-ribbon panel called on the Alberta government to encourage partial upgrading of bitumen from the oilsands to enhance value and free up more pipeline room for exports, the idea remains years away from commercialization.In its royalty review report in January 2016, the panel led by ATB Financial CEO Dave Mowat pointed out that if heavy, sticky bitumen were partly upgraded, there would be less need to add light petroleum to dilute it so it will flow in a pipeline — meaning as much as 30 per cent more bitumen could be stuffed into existing pipelines.It would also boost profits because companies wouldn’t have to buy diluent, which is generally priced in line with New York-traded West Texas Intermediate oil, the report said.Diluted bitumen as represented by Western Canadian Select crude currently sells for considerably less per barrel than WTI, a discount that has doubled in recent months from typical levels due in part to pipeline capacity constraints. The wider differential means Alberta producers are missing out on hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue.Last week, privately owned Fractal Systems Inc. announced that its Enhanced JetShear partial upgrading and acid reduction technology had proved — during a year of testing — its ability to improve bitumen quality, increase bitumen volumes shipped in pipelines and reduce overall greenhouse gas emissions.“We’re now ready for commercial deployment and we’re hoping we’re hitting the market at just the right time,” said Fractal chairman Joe Gasca.“An engineering study is now underway with our oilsands partner for a large-scale Enhanced JetShear facility. We should know more about the timing of an investment decision later this year.”The company is partnering with oilsands producer Cenovus Energy Inc., aided by a $3.7-million federal grant approved in 2015 from Sustainable Development Technology Canada.Cenovus is investigating several partial upgrading technologies for potential future investment, according to CEO Alex Pourbaix.“We’re seeing some positive indications but I think we’re still in what I would call the R and D stage,” he said. “It isn’t something we’re going to be rolling out on a commercial basis in the short term.”Fractal said it has processed more than 225,000 barrels of diluted bitumen trucked to a 1,000-barrel-per-day pilot plant from steam-driven oilsands operations in northern Alberta. The facility succeeded in reducing the need for diluent by up to 53 per cent while improving oil quality through the reduction of olefins and acidity, the company said.Fractal president Ed Veith said a 50,000-barrel-per-day Enhanced JetShear facility at an oilsands project is estimated to cost about $275 million to build. It would result in savings from lower transportation and diluent costs of about $7.50 per barrel, based on 2017 average prices.However, proving partial upgrading technology works is one thing, while putting it into practice is another, said Kent Fellows, research associate at the School of Public Policy at the University of Calgary.“We’re probably looking at measuring in years, definitely not in weeks or months,” he said. “There is a lot of risk still in this, which has the potential to kill it in the nest before it gets out.”Fellows said producers looking to invest must ensure positive results from small pilot plants will be duplicated on a larger scale. They also need to make sure their customers will be willing to pay to use the resulting crude in their refineries. And the projects have to be able to pass regulatory hurdles.Alberta’s carbon tax creates another potential problem, Fellows added.Raw bitumen shipped to the U.S. Gulf Coast is processed in Texas, which has no carbon tax, he said. If it’s partly upgraded in Alberta, the producer will have to pay Alberta’s carbon tax on any emissions from the process — even if, as technology developers promise, the overall greenhouse gas emissions wind up being slightly lower.Fractal has been in touch with the Alberta government about the carbon tax issue, Gasca said, but it’s unclear whether anything can be done to address it.A School of Public Policy report funded by Alberta Innovates, the province’s applied research arm, suggested a year ago that a 100,000-barrel-per-day partial upgrading facility could add $10 to $15 of value to each barrel of bitumen.It listed 10 pre-commercial technologies that have been tested or proposed for deployment in Alberta.Alberta Innovates has hired an engineering firm to produce a report to be delivered by the end of February that will evaluate pre-commercial partial upgrading technologies.About 60 per cent of Alberta’s oilsands production is shipped in its raw form. The rest is typically upgraded into synthetic crude oil, a light product that flows easily in a pipeline and usually fetches near-WTI prices.Follow @HealingSlowly on Twitter.Companies mentioned in this story: (TSX:CVE, TSX:SU)last_img read more

Beaverlodge RCMP seek public assistance to locate missing youth

first_imgWEMBLEY, A.B. – Beaverlodge RCMP are asking for the public’s assistance in locating 16 year old Madison Dugray. Madison was last seen on January 23, 2019 in Wembley.Madison is described as:– Indigenous female– 5’6″, 160 lbs.– Brown hair, brown eyes– Wearing a red sweater and jeans The investigation is ongoing and there is a general concern for her well-being. If you have information on the whereabouts of Madison Dugray please call the Beaverlodge RCMP at 780-354-2955 or call your local police. If you wish to remain anonymous, you can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), online at www.P3Tips.com or by using the “P3 Tips” app available through the Apple App or Google Play Store.last_img read more