Dream Riders cycle for kids

first_imgNedbank Dream Catchers – riders who raised more than R15 000 in 2012 – from left to right: Bastiaan Smit, finance executive at Nedbank Retail; Veronique Breugelmans, a Reach For A Dream volunteer; Bronwyn du Preez, Business IT Strategist at Nedbank Retail; and, Louise Davies, from Nedbank Wealth.(Image: Nedbank Dream Riders)MEDIA CONTACTS• Nkosinathi MsizaNedbank: Communications+27 11 295 3560Ray MaotaOver 200 youngsters will benefit after a team of passionate and dedicated cyclists raised over R1-million for the Reach for a Dream Foundation, which helps youngsters with life-threatening ailments fulfil their life dreams. A growing teamA team of 488 cyclists took part in the 2012 94.7 Cycle Challenge in Johannesburg and collectively raised R1 050-million (US$118 801) for various projects. Dream Riders began in 2007 when eight employees at Nedbank, one of South Africa’s big four banks, collected sponsorships from friends and family for every kilometre of the Momentum 94.7 Cycle Challenge they completed.By joining the team, each cyclist commits to raising at least R1 200 ($135) in sponsorships and donations, while riders can ride either the 40km, mountain bike or road race as a Dream Rider. The annual 94.7 Cycle Challenge is the world’s second-largest timed cycle race, after the Cape Argus Cycle Race, which takes place each year in Cape Town.Between 20 000 and 30 000 riders complete the challenging 94.7km course every year. The event’s main sponsors are radio station 94.7 Highveld Stereo and Momentum, the life insurance company. Volunteering to helpKone Gugushe, the divisional executive of corporate social responsibility at Nedbank, explains: “We encourage our employees and clients to volunteer in support of our corporate service initiatives objectives to develop and grow volunteerism in the workplace as a logical extension of our vision-led, values-driven ethos, as well as our deep green aspiration of being highly involved in the community and environment.”Nedbank’s staff members are encouraged to play their part in uplifting and empowering communities through volunteering for such initiatives. Some of those for which they volunteer are: the Local Hero Programme, which encourages and honours individuals who participate in volunteer work by supporting their projects financially; and the Team Challenge Programme, a 10-month staff volunteerism programme in which staff form teams that support various non-profit organisations. Reaching for the dreamGugushe said: “Reach for a Dream gives hope and fulfils dreams of over 200 children with life-threatening ailments in our society and we believe that this contribution will enable them to help more children … Additionally, through such initiatives, we are able to extend our reach and make a meaningful difference where we might not have been able to reach ourselves.”Bronwyn Feldwick-Davis, Reach for a Dream’s projects and marketing manager, said it was a landmark year for the foundation as the number of riders doubled, and together they raised R1-million ($113 147).“This makes the Dream Riders one of our biggest fundraising events of the year and enables us to distribute the funds to all of our seven branches. Nedbank once again sponsored all the costs for the team, for which we are so grateful,” she said. “This allows all the money raised by the cyclists to go directly to dreams and projects and not expenses.” How the money helpsReach for a Dream helps youngsters aged from three to 18. According to Dream Riders, to fulfil a dream for a child who has a life-threatening illness, on average costs R3 500. The diseases that the youngsters who benefit from this project have include cystic fibrosis, HIV/Aids, renal failure, type 1 diabetes, and leukaemia.They have varying wishes, among them going scuba diving, going shopping, going to the airport, going on a steam train ride, meeting the president, and going on a submarine ride.Reach for a Dream says that for children with life-threatening illnesses, the magic of childhood may be lost in the emotional, physical and financial strain of dealing with their disease. The foundation tries to alleviate some of this strain, which often affects the whole family, by creating a different environment for the child – one that is not focused on her or his illness.last_img read more

Is “fat” a four-letter word?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Is fat a bad word? Not necessarily. Simply put, fat is just the body’s storage form of energy. If an animal consumes more energy than it uses, the excess calories will be stored as fat — money in the bank to be used in an energy shortage (think cows calving in late winter). Fat also imparts flavor to food (like a T-bone steak) but it also adds calories. So managing fat can be a delicate issue in the cattle business.Presently, eating quality of beef is estimated to a large degree by the amount of marbling (intramuscular fat) that it contains. Tenderness is also important but is generally a function of age (younger is better). Marbling generally increases after the animal attains some maturity and external fattening has occurred. External fat is frequently used as an indication of when cattle will have enough marbling to grade choice or prime. I know what you are thinking — why don’t we just measure marbling? We’re getting to that with ultrasound technology and it would allow us to avoid over finishing (high yield grades) of fed cattle. Ideally, marbling would occur in feedlot cattle with very little external fat being present. We would like to have Choice and Prime quality grades with yield grades of 2 or 3 for our fed cattle. But . . . If we bred cattle to meet this criterion, what would it mean to the beef cow herd? Don’t ever take fleshing ability away from the brood cow herd! It will have a negative effect on reproduction.It is important to understand how cattle fatten so that we can manage them accordingly. Fat is “laid down” from front to back and top to bottom. The fore ribs and spinous processes are covered first then the fat cover continues backward and downward. That’s why folks look for cod fat (in the scrotal area) as an indicator of when cattle are finished. It is the last place to fatten. Loss of body fat happens in reverse order. Fat cover is the basis for condition scoring in beef cattle.Body condition has a definite impact on reproductive performance. Cows should generally be at a Body Condition Score (BCS) of five at the beginning of the breeding season. A cow with a BCS of 5 will have some fat reserves, with fat cover over all the ribs. As cows lose condition (in the reverse order that it was put on) a BCS 5 would become a BCS 4 when they lose condition so there is no cover over the last two ribs. This would mean that the cow has very marginal energy reserves for good reproductive performance. If this loss of condition (fat reserves) continues so that you can see the foreribs (BCS 3), then you have a real problem. Conception rates will suffer.Loss of condition generally happens after calving when dietary energy needs have increased dramatically and feed supplied isn’t meeting those needs. The cow has to “withdraw, from the bank” to meet her nutritional needs. It is important that some energy reserves are available.And what about the herd bulls(s)? We need some energy reserves so that bulls can stay active during the breeding season but … bulls are athletes. They should have muscling, sound feet and legs and be able to sire a large number of calves in a short period of time. At least that is what we say we want but then we frequently buy young, fat bulls that look great at the start of the breeding season and are a wreck before the season is over.Why does this happen? Probably because we confuse fat with muscling. We are looking at thickness as a sign of muscling but it could just be a layer of fat. Fat can “plaster over” thin-muscled cattle. Fat doesn’t move but muscles will “ripple”. Watch the animals as they move. Observe the hindquarters and shoulders. Remember, “if it ain’t movin’, it ain’t muscle!”So managing fat (or condition) is important in the cattle business, especially in the cowherd for optimum reproduction. Fat is important — both too much or too little can be a problem. Astute producers recognize the importance of efficient cattle that can maintain adequate energy reserves without wasting feed resources.last_img read more

U.S. Supreme Court decides not to look into EPA efforts in the Chesapeake Bay

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Many in agriculture were disappointed in the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision not to review a lower court ruling allowing the Environmental Protection Agency’s efforts in the Chesapeake Bay.While this action relates to the EPA’s “blueprint” for restoring the Chesapeake Bay, it has national implications related to the power and reach of the federal government under the Clean Water Act.“The EPA has consistently pushed the legal limits of the Clean Water Act, with the Chesapeake Bay blueprint and the Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) rule being two of the most recent examples,” said Chip Bowling, National Corn Growers Association president , who farms on the Chesapeake Bay watershed in southern Maryland. “When Congress passed the Clean Water Act, their intention was to create balanced, practical policies to protect America’s water resources with a clear division of power between states and the federal government. In both of these cases, the EPA’s actions represent an unlawful expansion of their authority. That’s why we joined this petition on the Chesapeake Bay TMDL, and we are party to a lawsuit challenging the WOTUS rule.“We support the goals of the Clean Water Act, and we remain committed to working with the EPA and other stakeholders to protect our water resources.”last_img read more

Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation awards $34,000 in scholarships

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation recently awarded $34,000 in scholarships to students across the state. The foundation annually recognizes Ohio students for their academic effort, community engagement and career interests that link agriculture to community service, education or scientific research. Cindy Hollingshead ScholarshipRecipients are Sarah Lehner of Delaware County; Meredith Oglesby of Highland County; Katie Frost of Fayette County; Todd Peterson of Fayette County; Louisa Pullins of Wood County; Sumedha Kappagantula of Butler County; Kady Davis of Carroll County; Kaitlyn Evans of Richland County and Danielle Leeper of Union County. This fund honors Cynthia Anne (Cindy) Hollingshead for her 39 years of service as Ohio Farm Bureau’s executive secretary, as well as a lifetime of volunteer commitment to local government and community service activities. Financial assistance goes to students who are pursuing careers focused on agriculture, community service and association leadership. Darwin Bryan ScholarshipRecipients are Kristen Eisenhauer of Richland County; Katie Frost of Fayette County; Melanie Fuhrmann of Scioto County; Sarah Lehner of Delaware County and Todd Peterson of Fayette County. This fund was established in 1985 in honor of Darwin R. Bryan whose enthusiastic leadership during his 37 years of service to Ohio Farm Bureau has been an inspiration to rural youth throughout Ohio. The fund assists students who have been active in Farm Bureau’s youth program and/or whose parents are Farm Bureau members. Jack Fisher ScholarshipRecipients are Cora Dorman of Licking County; Kady Davis of Carroll County; Mary Baker of Wayne County; Garrett Stanfield of Adams County; Todd Peterson of Fayette County; Meredith Oglesby of Highland County; Savannah Ireland of Jackson County; Kayla Walls of Mercer County; Abigail Durheim of Delaware County, and Sarah Lehner of Delaware County. This fund is named after John C. “Jack” Fisher, Ohio Farm Bureau’s executive vice president for 20 years. His vision for this scholarship is to enable people to acquire the necessary tools for a more fulfilling life. Kenny Walter Scholarship FundKady Davis of Carroll County and Cora Dorman of Licking County received this award, which honors Kenny Walter, a long-time Farm Bureau staff member, leader and advocate for rural Ohio. The fund provides scholarships to students pursuing post-secondary education in agriculture who come from the 29 northeastern counties Walter served as a regional supervisor and organization director. Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation Scholar AwardReceiving this award are Clare Sollars of Fayette County; Todd Peterson of Fayette County; Garrett Stanfield of Adams County and Meredith Oglesby of Highland County. This award recognizes students for academic effort, community service and career interests that use agriculture to enhance the partnership between producers and consumers in rural, suburban and/or urban settings. Women’s Leadership in Agriculture ScholarshipReceiving the scholarship are Sarah Lehner of Delaware County; Melanie Fuhrmann of Scioto County; Katie Frost of Fayette County; Meredith Oglesby of Highland County; Holly Schmenk of Putnam County; Olivia Blay of Portage County and Courtney Heiser of Seneca County. This scholarship is for students who have chosen a career path that benefits agricultural or community development such as food production, scientific research, education/outreach or leadership development. The program was established by an endowment from the Charlotte R. Schmidlapp Fund, FifthThird Bank, Trustee.last_img read more

Para athletes seek public help for funding through ‘Alay Para Atleta’

first_img“Alay Para Atleta” is expected to be launched at around July to August.“We cannot just sit back and hope that things will happen. We have to be proactive, help the government to support sports as a whole, especially sports for people with disabilities. We can’t just let the government do all the spending and supporting us. We need the private sector and the Filipino to come out and support the paralympic movement to help them in the long run, and I hope this call to arms will generate the enthusiasm and provide inspiration to come around and help the cause,” said Barredo.Athletes of the PPC-PHILSPADA have their sights set on the 9th ASEAN Para Games in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia this September, the 2018 Asian Para Games in Indonesia, the 10th ASEAN Para Games in Manila, and the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games.Also in attendance in the summit were Philippine Olympic Committee president Peping Cojuangco, Paralympic bronze medalists Josephine Medina and Adeline Dumapong-Ancheta, swimmer Ernie Gawilan, and representatives from the Philippine Sports Commission.ADVERTISEMENT The social media-based drive, which is seeking to get help from the masses, is a nationwide campaign that encourages the general public to participate in the paralympic movement via a P50 annual contribution through mobile phone access.“It will be digital, social media-based to help us. We’re targeting P1 million for the people to buy in to the paralympic movement, which will fund research, hiring professionals, so that we can help the athletes more,” said Barredo.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutMobile donations can be made through texting “ALAYPARA (amount)” to 3456, where the public can donate from P10 to P500.Also, Information Gateway will release Juan2Run mobile game, reminiscent to the popular app “Temple Run,” with proceeds from downloading the app going to benefit PPC-PHILSPADA. LATEST STORIES Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games What ‘missteps’? Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ Ravena: Chooks-Pilipinas raring to bask in 3×3 limelight Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken WATCH: Firefighters rescue baby seal found in parking garagecenter_img 1 dead in Cavite blast, fire PPC-PHILSPADA president Mike Barredo. CONTRIBUTED PHOTOIn hopes of gathering more for sports for disabled athletes, the Philippine Paralympic Committee (PPC) and the Philippine Sports Association for the Differently Abled (PHILSPADA) is set to launch “Alay Para Atleta” program.PPC-PHILSPADA president Mike Barredo announced the development Friday during the First Philippine Para Sports Summit at Microtel by Wyndham in Quezon City.ADVERTISEMENT Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games View comments World’s 50 Best Restaurants launches new drinking and dining guide Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chickenlast_img read more