Rams 48, 49ers 32: No. 2 draft pick secured, Kittle sets record

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos or video on a mobile deviceLOS ANGELES — One of the 49ers’ most miserable seasons reached its merciful end Sunday with a 48-32 loss to the playoff-bound Los Angeles Rams.The glorious upside: they clinched the No. 2 overall draft pick, by virtue of their 4-12 record and strength-of-schedule tiebreaker.True glory, however, was achieved by George Kittle, who set a NFL record for most receiving yards in a season by a tight end, doing so …last_img read more

What’s wrong with the Warriors? Steve Kerr shares his thoughts

first_imgKlay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up!OAKLAND – This time, the Warriors did not hold a long film session or an intense scrimmage.Unlike after their 33-point loss last week to an Eastern Conference contender (Boston Celtics), Warriors coach Steve Kerr decided against punishing his team with that workload following their defeat on Sunday to the Western Conference’s worst team (Phoenix Suns). Therefore, …last_img read more

Ignoring Networks at Your Professional Peril

first_imgAuthor: Jim LangcusterThis article was originally published Tuesday August 27, 2013 on the Military Families Learning Network blog.This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Hi, AleX:You have always been a dedicated professional. Your work has always been about serving your clients, building one-on-one relationships grounded in trust.British Coffeehouses in the 17th century provided raucous places where ideas could be freely discussed and exchanged.It’s reflected in the way you regard network literacy. Admit it, AleX: Deep in the back of your mind, you still harbor this fear that any significant investment in social media will work to dilute these close relationships.That’s understandable. Just be warned: By ignoring emerging social networks, you’re imperiling your professional future.It’s important for you to come to terms with that fact, AleX.Granted, a handful of CEOs pointing to a clutch of online infographics, some specious at best, stubbornly maintain that networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter are not only eroding the minds of young people but also costing the economy some $650 billion a year.Don’t buy into it, Alex.Truth is, the benefits of social networking have been apparent for a long time, a very long time — in fact, for as long as 500 years.Rudimentary forms of social networking have been traced as far back as 17th century English coffeehouses, raucous places in which people shared ideas freely and openly and that bore an uncanny resemblance to the emerging social media platforms of the 21st century.Many of the exchanges that grew out of these boisterous meeting places provided the basis for intellectual and material advances that have benefited countless millions of people and that are still being felt today, almost half a millennium later — a theme explored by famed science and technology writer Tom Standage in a recent article in the New York Times titled “Social Networking in the 1600s.”Proponents of conventional wisdom of the day derided these coffeehouses as venues of idle chitchat, much as their 21st century counterparts do with social media today.To be sure, lots of idle chitchat and gossip occurred in these haunts. Yet, something remarkable happened too. In addition to consuming copious amounts of coffee and indulging in idle gossip, not a few of these coffeehouse patrons read and shared the insights from the latest pamphlets and news sheets, many of which dealt with the prevailing scientific, literary, political and commercial themes of the day.In a diary entry dated in November, 1633, renowned diarist Samuel Pepys observed that discussion covered such diverse topics as how to store beer, the implications of a certain type of nautical weapon, and speculations about the outcome of an upcoming trial.Conventional academic leaders of the day heaped scorn on the low caliber of discourse that purportedly prevailed in these coffeehouses.“Why doth solid and serious learning decline, and few or none follow it now in the university,” Oxford academic Anthony Wood plaintively asked. “Answer: Because of Coffee Houses, where they spend all their time.”They were misinformed. Lots of serious discussion and learning ensued in these coffeehouses.Borrowing Standage’s picturesque term, these coffeehouses turned out to be “crucibles of creativity” — environments in which people representing diverse backgrounds and perspectives met and exchanged ideas. Many of these ideas, in the course of meeting and mating, provided the basis for new ways of thinking, which, in turn, spawned new concepts and inventions. Some ended up changing the course of history.One of the more noteworthy examples of coffeehouse exchanges: Lloyd’s of London, the world-renowned insurance firm, which grew out of Edward Lloyd’s coffeehouse, a popular haunt of ship captains, ship owners and maritime traders.One coffeehouse served as the nursery of modern economics: Adam Smith passed early drafts of “The Wealth of nations” among his acquaintances at the Cockspur Street coffeehouse, where many Scottish artists and intellectuals of his time gathered.Yet, why should we be surprised by this? For his part, Standage cites modern research demonstrating that students learn more effectively when they are interacting with other learners.Coffeehouses provided 17th century entrepreneurs, journalists, scientists and philosophers with highly generative, open-source platforms — foundations on which many of the predominant ideas, concepts and technologies of the modern era took form.This brings us back to the present-day, AleX. As Standage stresses in his article, the emerging social media platforms of the 21st century are providing us with the same kinds of highly generative platforms — places where people, in the course of exchanging ideas and sparking new ones, have the potential of improving the lives of countless millions of people for generations to come.Under the circumstances, is there any reason why you shouldn’t join into this conversation, AleX? This is part of the “Hi, AleX” series — advice to AleX NetLit about enhancing her levels of network literacy through day-to-day personal and professional social networking. AleX Netlit is a fictional persona created by Network Literacy Community of Practice to serve as a guide to Military Families Service professionals, Cooperative Extension educators and others seeking to learn more about using online networks in their work.More about Alex NetLitlast_img read more