Saint Mary’s alumna serves the U.S. Virgin Islands

first_imgEditor’s Note: This is the fifth story in a series featuring Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s graduates serving as members of Congress. This series, titled “Trading Golden Dome for Capitol Dome,” will run on Fridays.  As the federal government shutdown reaches its 11th day, Congresswoman Donna Christensen (D-U.S. Virgin Islands) said she is concerned for the almost 700 federal employees in the territory who are being furloughed or facing reduced pay.  Christensen, who graduated from Saint Mary’s in 1966 with a Bachelor of Science degree, is one of six non-voting members of Congress. The Virgin Islands, Guam, Puerto Rico, District of Columbia, Northern Mariana Islands and American Samoa all send delegates who are asked to weigh in on issues under legislation to Congress. Congresswoman Madeleine Bordallo of Guam also attended Saint Mary’s, but her office declined repeated requests from The Observer for interviews. Christensen said the current shutdown of the federal government could have a dramatic effect on the economy of the U.S. Virgin Islands.  “We are a community that has been facing some severe economic lows with the closing of our largest private industry, government insurance falls and the impact of the recession which generally comes a little later than [when the impact hits the] mainland but stays longer and has a great impact,” Christensen said. “This is just making a bad situation far worse for us as we try to recover from our economic issues and challenges.” Her constituents began flooding her office with phone calls immediately after the shutdown, she said. “The first complaint I began getting was from the national park in St. John,” Christensen said. “St. John is a small island and two-thirds of it is a national park, so everything in St. John depends on the national park. … The calls came from taxi drivers, small business owners whose businesses are being impacted, the wedding planners who have people coming in to get married in one of the beautiful sites … our national parks cannot utilize that venue anymore, this has been a big issue.  “I traveled on Tuesday [September 1] and the customs board of protection was there and of course TSA [Transportation Security Administration] [workers] were there, but nobody was sure when they were going to get another paycheck. That is not a good environment in which to work.” No limitations Christensen, who was the first female physician to be elected to Congress, said she treasures the time she spent at Saint Mary’s. She credits the College as one of the key factors in the development of the confidence she now uses as a member of Congress, she said.  “Going to an all-women’s college … gave me confidence and I think that it prepared me well,” Christensen said. When she first came to Saint Mary’s, Christensen said she was planning on going into medical technology, but after reading an article published by the National Negro College Fund, she said she decided to changer her career plans and become a doctor.  “When I had doubts about whether I was capable of being a doctor, my biology chair, Dr. Clarence Dinnen, was there for support and encouragement,” Christensen said. “I thought that was very important.” This positive support helped her when others expressed concern about her ability to enter a “man’s field,” she said. “I remember one time a family member of a schoolmate said to me, ‘I don’t think you should do that, that’s not a good idea, going to medical school,’” Christensen said. “I remember being really taken aback by that, but then I dismissed it. The kind of confidence I gained, the education I received and the support I had from the faculty made it something that I didn’t think twice about. After Professor Divine sat me down and said ‘I could do whatever I wanted to do,’ I never worried.” After graduating from Saint Mary’s, Christensen said she received a Doctor of Medicine in 1970 from George Washington University School of Medicine and completed her residency in 1974. Coming home The day after she finished her residency, Christensen said she came home to the U.S. Virgin Islands. “I began working in a small emergency room in 1975, and after being home and hearing some of the issues that were of concern to my community I decided to become active in the community,” Christensen said. “It is home and there were things that were happening that I thought individuals needed to be more proactive about, so I decided to involve myself in different issues like the appointment of local judges, sale of land ⎯ that was important to my community and the private industry. But, I was doing it as an organizer myself, organizing different coalitions and different groups to advocate or oppose an issue.” At the time, Christensen said maintaining a private practice in family medicine and while adapting to life as a new mother drove her to find a formal way to participate in community organizing. “At this point I had a young baby and was working, so I decided to join the Democratic Party,” Christensen said. ” I joined by running for a seat on my local territorial committee. I won and became an officer. I did that because I thought the Democratic Party would be a good vehicle for me to do some of the things I wanted to do and I wouldn’t have to be doing it by myself.” After serving for 12 years as a Democratic National Committeewoman, Christensen said she was urged to run for national office in 1994. After losing her first primary race in 1994, Christensen said she ran again in 1996 and won the Virgin Islands seat.  “I had been practicing [medicine] and [working] in politics at the same time, so it wasn’t an abrupt transition, it was more of shifting the balance,” Christensen said. “In my practice you always find that there are a lot of social and other issues that impact the health of your patients. Many times people would come in just to talk about whatever problems they were having, and so I kind of looked at it as bringing my office work from a local level to a larger, national level. I did promise my patients that I would remain active in healthcare, even if I was not their private physician anymore.” Territorial interests Christensen said being a delegate of a territory is more challenging than being a woman or being a minority in Congress.  “Territories are not states, so in many instances the Constitution does not explicitly provide territories with the same rights and privileges as it does states,” Christensen said. “Therefore, I don’t get to vote in final passage [of bills] or to even voting in committee of the whole is a matter of contention because while the Democrats feel we should vote, the Republicans don’t. So when Democrats are in the majority we vote in the committee of the whole and when they are not, we don’t.” Christensen, who currently serves on the Committee on Energy and Commerce, is the first delegate from a territory to sit on an exclusive committee. Due to the expansive list of policy concerns that fall in the Committee’s jurisdiction, members who serve on one of the four exclusive committees – the other three being Appropriations, Ways and Means and House Financial Services – are not allowed to serve on other House committees.  She said she the support of the Congressional Black Caucus pushed her not only to sit on the at-large committee, but also on the Subcommittee on Health.  “Just getting on those committees were a big milestone for me,” Christensen said. “I was there when we wrote the Affordable Care Act, and that is an experience I will remember for the rest of my life and feel proud to be a part of it. I consider that a major event in my life.” Now, Christensen sits on the Subcommittee on Energy and Power. She said she not only works for members of her district, but also strives to push legislation through Congress for all of the territories. “I was also on the Committee [on Energy and Commerce] when we did the American Reinvestment Act ⎯ that was very important to help us recover from recession,” Christensen said. “My presence on that helped my territory to get a significant amount of funding, as well as the other territories. As a delegate from a territory, one of my responsibilities is to look out not only for my own, but for all of the territories.” A desire to serve  Christensen said her time as a part of the larger Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame and South Bend communities during this the Civil Rights Movement instilled in her a desire to serve. “After the summer where all of the riots, the bombings and all of that happened there was a change to me in Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame,” Christensen said. “We did become more socially conscious, and I think it was at that point that we started going into the South Bend community, Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students together. We would go into South Bend and help kids with homework and we developed Big Brothers, Big Sisters for some of the poorer kids in town.  ” … Even though we were farther away and we were not involved in the protests or the marches, I think the Civil Rights Movement had a profound impact on us and I think it elevated our social justice awareness and efforts.” Christensen said she was also at Saint Mary’s when she found out about the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 and President John F. Kennedy’s death in 1963. “I was [at Saint Mary’s] during some very important times in our nation’s history,” she said. “I am sure the dialogue and how we dealt with those issues had a lot to do with why I am here [in Congress serving others] as well.”  Christensen said she feels proud to be an alumna of Saint Mary’s.  “When I first came here [to Congress] there were four Saint Mary’s women,” Christensen said. “Imagine that a small college like ours could have four members of Congress serving at the same time. I thought that was amazing and it is to Saint Mary’s credit [as an educational institution]. Now three of us are still here.  “I do treasure the time I spent at Saint Mary’s and I do count it as being responsible in part for the successes I have achieved through my lifetime.” Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at krabac01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

Cadiz mayor seeks ‘fast release’ of COVID-19 test results

first_img“We are struggling on how to contain LSIs and repatriated overseas workers,” Escalante explained. According to the city mayor, the longer these repatriates stay at quarantine facilities, the more expense it will be for the city government. He pointed out that locally stranded individuals (LSIs) cannot be released from the city’s quarantine facilities without getting first their COVID-19 test results. “This will decongest the Teresita Lopez Jalandoni Provincial Hospital and we will invite neighboring provinces to have their swab samples tested at the proposed laboratory,” Escalante said./PN In a related development, Escalante revealed that the city intends to establish its own molecular laboratory in partnership with a private company. Cadiz City has 11 COVID-19 positive cases as of Friday.center_img “The city is providing their food, security detail, manpower and utilities,” Escalante said. BACOLOD City – Mayor Salvador Escalante of Cadiz City, Negros Occidental emphasized the importance of releasing the test results for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in a fast manner – so as not to delay the needed response in controlling the viral illness. BY DOMINIQUE GABRIEL BAÑAGA “The release of swab test results is still slow running up 12 to 25 days at Teresita Lopez Jalandoni Provincial Hospital in Silay City,” Escalante lamented.last_img read more

Women’s hockey looks to finish chances in weekend matchup against North Dakota

first_imgFollowing a sweep of Bemidji State, the Wisconsin women’s hockey team is looking to build its case for the No. 1 ranking against North Dakota this weekend. In a two-game away series, the Badgers will take the ice, with hopes to continue their recent success.Last week, the Badgers won two one-goal games after nearly doubling their opponent’s shot total in each game. The focus this week is finishing those chances.“We didn’t have good habits in those games, so in the first two days of practice this week, we’ve been harping on, doing the little things right and getting back on track,” leading goal-scorer, redshirt senior forward Brittany Ammerman, said.Ammerman, who’s been off to a hot start (six goals, five assists and 11 points through 10 games), is finding the back of the net with ease and playing with a confidence only seen among the most skilled of players. The Badgers will be looking to feed her the puck and give her good chances when they roll into North Dakota.Despite North Dakota possessing a large defensive unit, the Badgers will continue their system of creating screens and deflections in front of the net. That deviates from the usual style of playing near the boards when facing a larger team. The Badgers’ system has worked very well for the team so far, as they’ve outscored opponents 38-14 through 10 games with Ammerman leading the charge.“The hunger will be increased this weekend with a weekend off next week,” Ammerman said. “I work hard to get in the position I am … and we’ll be chipping the puck by them and trying to make them turn. [In the crease] we’ll be looking to be our usual pesky selves and hopefully draw some penalties in the process.”After opening the scoring in Saturday’s 4-3 win over Bemidji State, look for Ammerman to continue to roll past North Dakota this weekend.On the defensive side, sophomore goaltender Ann-Renee Desbiens has been a force to be reckoned with between the pipes. With three shutouts through only 10 games, Desbiens has been sharp, posting a 1.61 GAA and allowing 13 goals. Paired with a large youth contingent on defense, Desbiens and the defenseman in front of her have meshed the more they play with each other.“I think it’s nice to have a younger core so we can play with each other for a longer period of time,” Desbiens said. “We still have a couple of years together, so it’s nice to build this confidence with each other and improve it.”That confidence has led the Badgers to an 8-2-0 record and No. 2 ranking in the USA Today poll. As Desbiens and her teammates continue to play together, she feels they can only improve upon what they’ve done so far and that what the Badgers have in store for the future is very exciting.“I learned a lot from last weekend, so every single game I get ready the same way no matter who we play,” Desbiens said. “It was a great learning opportunity.”With both the offense and defense playing and practicing confidently, there is excitement that the Badgers will elevate their already superb play. The team skated both Monday and Tuesday, where they practiced shooting and passing drills, prepping to deliver an offensive onslaught against No. 10-ranked and 4-4-0 North Dakota.The added depth this year has head coach Mark Johnson pleased and confident about the Badgers’ chances this weekend and going forward in the season. He said the experience some bench players had already gained when the team was missing some key players in its first few series was valuable.“It’ll be a good challenge and an opportunity for some other kids to get some ice-time,” Johnson said. “We have some depth this year … so we have capable people to come in and fill those minutes. We’ll give a couple of players an opportunity, and hopefully they come out and take advantage of it.”With the 2014-2015 season starting to kick into gear, the Badgers are looking to build a head of steam and push on against some tough upcoming opponents in a long away streak. Their next four series include North Dakota this weekend away, Minnesota State at home, St. Cloud State away and New Hampshire away.last_img read more

Pizza Klatch is Searching for its Next Executive Director

first_imgFacebook48Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Pizza KlatchPizza Klatch, a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization based in Thurston County, Washington, is searching for its next Executive Director.  This is a full-time, salaried position.Pizza Klatch is a nonprofit dedicated to helping LGBTQ+ youth in our area. Photo courtesy: Pizza KlatchFor more information on the responsibilities and duties this position as well as employment details, please download the full job listing and send a resume and three references to Pizza Klatch Board President Marissa Rathbone, marissa@pizzaklatch.org.Our MissionTo foster resiliency in LGBTQ+ youth and create a safe and positive school experience through support, education and empowerment.Our VisionLGBTQ+ youth will be empowered to self-advocate, build community, develop confidence, and easily access resources as they explore and develop their identities.  School will be a positive and supportive space where LGBTQ+ youth are accepted and celebrated – free to learn without violence, harassment, discrimination, suicidal ideation or self-harm.Pizza Klatch offers weekly support groups for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Questioning Youth (LGBTQ) and their allies in Thurston County, Washington.  PK provides free pizza, two trained facilitators for each group, and a convenient and safe forum for discussion and education.  Presently there are   19 Pizza Klatch groups at 11 local high schools, attended by 8-25 students per lunch, approximately 300 youth per week.Organizational Goals●    Decrease suicide and suicidal attempts of LGBTQ+ students.●    Reduce bullying in schools, reduce self-harm and risky behavior.●    Help students to feel strong enough to intervene when they witness bullying.●    Lend support so LGBTQ+ students feel less isolated in the school setting and will be more apt to graduate.●    Educate group members on various subjects and resources related to gender identity, sexual orientation, and social justice.For more information about Pizza Klatch, check out the Pizza Klatch website.last_img read more

MTN, Opera in mobile web partnership

first_imgOpera Mini, which claims to be the most popular mobile web browser, shrinks down websites and data by up to 90% before delivering the content to the phone, which according to MTN provides a faster, more affordable and user-friendly mobile web experience. “By offering faster access to websites and easy entry to MTN portals, MTN subscribers can reach the content they want, with less frustration and less expense,” MTN Group chief commercial officer Christian de Faria said in a statement this week. Small-screen strategy Under the agreement, MTN will centrally launch a tailor-made version of Opera Mini to each of its 21 markets, with localised links and content. By using Opera Mini, people get the most out of the web, plus get one-click access to MTN content portals via their Opera Mini startpage. Pan-African mobile operator MTN has signed an agreement with Opera Software to provide customers across its 21 markets with customised co-branded versions of the Opera Mini web browser, which cuts down on the amount of data used while browsing the web. “With just one click, customers have music, news, games and information on MTN products and services at their fingertips.” “We have seen incredible uptake of Opera Mini in that geography so far, and we look forward to building on that success with one of the region’s leading mobile communications providers.” Opera Mini has more than 115-million monthly users around the world, and is available on over 3 000 different phone models, including basic feature phones.center_img Bringing the best web experience De Faria said MTN wanted to offer its subscribers innovative mobile internet services that could have a positive impact on information, sharing and communication in their everyday lives. “We are eager to bring the best web experience to Africa and the Middle East, and working with MTN Group’s network enables us to achieve that,” said Opera Software CEO Lars Boilsen. The introduction of customised versions of Opera Mini strengthens the mobile operator’s small-screen strategy to radically improve its customers’ mobile web experience. 17 August 2011 SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Yes, Bill Gates Wants Better Condoms. But It’s No Joke

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting brian proffitt Let’s get all the snickering out of the way first: yes, Bill Gates is funding condom research. But the reasoning behind the new initiative is more important than improving awkward experiences by the glow of the dashboard light: this is about saving lives and enhancing quality of life in developing nations.First off, it’s not just Bill Gates that’s funding the research: the proposed initial funding of $100,000 is being provided by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which has a well-established record of seeking solutions for health issues that many of us in Western nations take for granted.Condoms are one such issue in developing nations, where they are needed to control transmission of sexually transmitted diseases and the HIV virus that causes AIDS. Their success as a birth control method, which can be a hot button issue in some cultures, is nonetheless undisputed.Cultural issues aside, one of the perceived problems (from the male perspective) is “that condoms decrease pleasure as compared to no condom, creating a trade-off that many men find unacceptable, particularly given that the decisions about use must be made just prior to intercourse,” according to the Grand Challenges in Global Health announcement.“Likewise, female condoms can be an effective method for prevention of unplanned pregnancy or HIV infection, but suffer from some of the same liabilities as male condoms, require proper insertion training and are substantially more expensive than their male counterparts,” the program added.To help solve the problem, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is offering $100,000 in initial funding (and up to $1 million) for anyone who can come up with the “next generation condom.”“We are looking for a Next Generation Condom that significantly preserves or enhances pleasure, in order to improve uptake and regular use. Additional concepts that might increase uptake include attributes that increase ease-of-use for male and female condoms, for example better packaging or designs that are easier to properly apply. In addition, attributes that address and overcome cultural barriers are also desired,” according to the Challenge.Issues like this, which carry various ranges of cultural taboos, depending on your stance, are nothing new for the Foundation. Last August, the Foundation announced the winners of its $100,000 prize to come up with a better toilet. The lack of proper sanitation facilities is a huge problem for billions, and coming up with a cheap and effective means of waste disposal was important enough to weather the inevitable jokes.There is little doubt that reactions to this latest health initiative will contain similar jokes, because birth control is outside a lot of people’s comfort zones. But there are also serious cultural and theological issues to keep in mind as well, more so than the sanitation program ever started. It will be interesting to see if there can really be a solution that can beat this challenge. Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Tags:#health#Sex Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Field Talk: A Q&A with Providers Supporting Military Families

first_imgThis post was written by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn. Field Talk is a monthly blog post sharing the voices of early childhood providers who serve or have served military families of young children with disabilities (birth to 5 years old).  We hope you find it to be educational, personable, and encouraging.This month we welcome Lana Sperry, M.A., CCC-SLP.  Lana works as a speech-language pathologist in Clarksville, TN.  The names within this interview have been changed and their stories used with permission.  This interview was edited for length and clarity.Describe your current role.I am a speech-language pathologist in a civilian hospital outpatient rehabilitation setting. In the clinic I see pediatric clients, where I am the sole provider of swallowing and feeding therapy for infants and children. I also provide augmentative communication device training, as well as speech and language therapy. Finally, I see adult and geriatric populations for whom provide swallowing, speech, language, voice, and cognitive therapy.What’s your favorite part of your current job?I love helping people. It’s an amazing feeling to see the smiles on people’s faces when they have accomplished a goal.Tell us about experiences you have had working with military families.In 2002, following graduate school, I moved to Clarksville, TN which is located very near Fort Campbell, KY. This area serves a large military population, and it was in in Clarksville that I began working with families in the military.The ages and diagnoses of individuals I have seen have ranged from infants to teens. These children have had diagnoses including: autism, spina bifida, developmental delays, Down syndrome, feeding difficulties, and speech-articulation impairments. I have learned that children with the same diagnosis can be very different.Fresh out of graduate school, I worked at a clinic that provided home health services to the birth to 3-year population. I vividly recall a 2 year old named ‘Sam,’ whose parents were young and the father was in the military. Sam was unable to communicate verbally. He would instead take adults to a desired object or bring an object to them. When upset he would escalate quickly and have difficulty calming himself. It was while working with Sam that I suspected he had autism. This was my first experience sharing my suspicions with parents. I referred them for further testing and this diagnosis was confirmed. Luckily the parents took the news well. It was important for them to remember that a diagnosis did not change their child. In therapy ‘Sam’ was able to use the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) to communicate. He was successful in using this system to request items such as toys and food. The family was reassigned and moved before we could try using an augmentative communication device with Sam. I will always remember ‘Sam’ as he was my first hands-on experience with a child with autism.Describe a rewarding experience working with military families.A few years ago I worked with a young child named Jessa. She had spina bifida, which resulted in her being paralyzed from the waist down. She was a cute little blonde who pushed herself around the clinic in a tiny wheelchair. Her communication skills were extremely limited due to severe oral and speech apraxia. She could produce a few basic vowels and would use these with appropriate voice inflection. A sentence such as “Look at that ball” might sound like “Oo aa aa ah.”I worked with Jessa 3 days a week, which allowed me to become close to her as well as her family. Progress was slow but present. We established that she could produce consonants such as “b” in “ball,” but she had to separate the word “buh – all”. Toward the end of her therapy, and prior to moving, Jessa could use a variety of word approximations involving many different consonants. When the family was preparing to move, the mom expressed sadness in having to leave the area and find a new speech therapist. It was very rewarding to have helped Jessa and to have given the parents a chance to see her progress. It is rewarding to have parents tell me that they wish they could take me with them to continue to treat their child. While I am pleased that parents have seen their child make progress, I am sad to say good-bye to them.Describe a challenging experience working with military families.Military families often move around a great deal which means frequent changes in medical and therapeutic providers. Therefore, it can be challenging to access therapy notes from former speech, physical, and occupational providers. Also, a child’s plan of care may not be met when a child is in my care for only a short amount of time due to military assignments.When one works with families for months or years there is a certain “sense of ownership” over the child’s intervention plan and their speech-language progress. So when a family has to leave and start working with another therapist, I feel a sense of loss. I do, however try to be available for the new therapist to answer questions.Also, as a civilian, I am not completely familiar with military terminology. This can be challenging when communicating with families. It is helpful to have some understanding of military acronyms.From your experience, how are military families similar and different from other types of families?Military families are generally in the area for shorter time periods than civilian families. I find that the parents, especially mothers, of children with disabilities are strong advocates for their children. In my experience, military mothers are often more assertive due to the need to fight for services for their child. In some ways, I adjust my practice when caring for a child in a military family. For example, if I know in advance that a family will only be living in the area for a short amount of time, I modify my plan of care to be more aggressive in an effort to address more targets during the family’s time here. However, in many ways I treat military families the same as civilian families.As providers, how can we support military parents who are deployed or away frequently due to trainings/school?  Communication between providers and families is essential. After every session I summarize the goals addressed in that session and the child’s performance on each goal. I send this home with the hope that it will help keep the caregiver informed of the child’s progress even when they cannot attend sessions.I try to understand the needs of each military family. If a family notifies me of upcoming travel or a deployment, and there is the need for the child to miss some appointments, I do my best to reserve availability on my schedule. For example, I am working with a child whose extended family is from another country. The mother has taken the children to visit family for the summer while the father is deployed. In this case, I did not discharge the child, but instead put his chart on “hold,” and when the child returns, I will re-evaluate him.Describe a specific stressor that military families with whom you have worked have shared or experienced.Military families who have children with disabilities have expressed stress when they have to re-establish services for their children in new towns. It can be difficult to move to a new city and try to find quality service providers. I generally try to do an Internet search or ask other SLPs to recommend providers. I also like to prepare a detailed letter including the child’s goals, test scores, and progress for the parent to give to the next therapist. This can help the new therapist initiate services.What “insider” tips or advice do you have for service providers working with military families who have young children with disabilities?Be open to and accepting of different cultures and ways of life. It is our place to listen to the parents and provide the best care possible to their children.If you could change or improve one thing for military families with young children with disabilities, what would it be?It would be nice if the military provided families with a list of physicians and service providers located near each military base.What types of resources have you sought out to feel more confident and competent at meeting the specific needs of military families? (e.g., trainings, blog posts, organizations, etc.)I have reached out to the parents of the children with whom I work. They are generally happy to explain the hierarchy of the military, the acronyms, the procedures, etc.last_img read more

5 officials detained for revelry at Shivneri fort

first_imgFive officials of the State Forest Department were booked by the Pune district rural police on Monday for allegedly holding a ‘liquor party’ in Shivneri fort in Junnar tehsil, 70 km from here.According to the police, the officials had indulged in inebriated revelry on Sunday night inside the fort premises on the eve of Shiv Jayanti celebrations. Maratha Warrior King Shivaji, who was born at the fort in 1630 C.E. had spent his childhood here.Some youths visiting the fort had filmed the officialsholding a drunken revelry in the fort premises. Junnar police detained the officials on seeing the clips. Two of them, Prakash Jadhav and Santosh Navgirhe, were suspended.With Junnar being actively promoted as the district’s ‘tourism tehsil’ , the officials had been assigned the task of upkeeping the fort premises and to prevent activities such as consuming alcoholic drinks on the premises.“A case has been registered against them under section 65 (e) of the Bombay Prohibition Act. While the officials were in the khaki uniform of policemen, they belonged to the State Forest Department,” said an officer from the Pune Rural Police.last_img read more

Land acquisition: Mayawati hits back, says Congress mother of corruption

first_imgUnder attack over violence in Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati on Thursday launched a scathing attack on Congress and BJP on the issue of land acquisition, saying farmers in states ruled by the two parties were agitated over poor compensation. Addressing BSP workers from Delhi at the Talkatora Indoor Stadium in New Delhi, the BSP chief alleged that Congress is considered as the “mother of corruption” in the country. Mayawati, under attack from opposition parties in UP on the issue of corruption, used the opportunity to attack the ruling party at the Centre on the same issue. Citing irregularities in the run up to the Commonwealth Games, she said the money wasted in corruption could haver been used to upgrade the living conditions of people from Uttar Pradesh and Bihar who have come the national capital to earn a living. Mayawati alleged that the “corruption” during the Commonwealth Games had the patronage and encouragement of Congress-ruled Delhi government. On the issue of land acquisition, said before accusing her party of wrongdoings on acquiring farmlands in the backdrop of violence in Bhatta Parsaul village in Greater Noida, Congress and BJP should take stock of situation in states ruled by the two parties. She claimed in Congress-ruled Delhi, Haryana, Rajasthan and Maharashtra and BJP-ruled Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh, farmers were agitated over receiving poor compensation for their lands acquired by the state governments. “Right under the nose of the central government, lands of farmers ares being acquired in Delhi at poor rates,” Mayawati said. Mayawati said BSP would press for an amended Land Acquisition Bill in the Monsoon session of Parliament and if need be the party workers would ‘ghearo’ the Parliament House on the issue. She claimed that unemployment and recent hike in fuel prices have aggrevated the problems being faced by the common man but Congress-led UPA was not serious in dealing with the situation as its leaders were busy pursuing their “narrow political interests.” The BSP asked the cadre to prepare itself for the next assembly elections in Delhi and said they will have to work with a missionary zeal if they wanted to have the party’s government installed in Delhi.advertisement- With PTI inputsFor more news on India, click here.For more news on Business, click here.For more news on Movies, click here.For more news on Sports, click here.last_img read more

Woody Harrelson Speaks At Liverpool Institute For Performing Arts

first_imgLast week students at The Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts (LIPA) were given a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to learn from one of Hollywood’s leading actors.Mark Featherstone-Witty and Woddy HarrelsonWoody Harrelson visited LIPA to take part in a one-hour question and answer session with students during which he talked about some of his most famous and celebrated roles.Speaking to a packed and excited audience in LIPA’s Paul McCartney Auditorium, the Oscar-nominated and Emmy-winning actor reflected on his work over the last three decades. The conversation was chaired by the Founding Principal/CEO of LIPA, Mark Featherstone-Witty, who introduced clips throughout the session from Harrelson’s roles in films such as ‘Natural Born Killers’ and ‘The Messenger’ (for which he received one of his two Oscar-nominations), last year’s acclaimed detective drama ‘True Detective’ and the sitcom ‘Cheers’, the show which first brought him to the public’s attention.Asked by one of LIPA’s BA (Hons) Acting students how he approaches creating characters for film, Harrelson replied: “As you’re reading a script, you get a feel for your character, and how they fit in to the piece. You need to look for the thing that opens the door to that character.”One of his main pieces of advice was for students not to hold back when bringing their characters to life: “I want to encourage you guys to be bold with your choices, and not go with what’s safe. I would rather go for it and get pulled back by a director, than play it safe and not do something special.”Harrelson talked about how he felt about working with film icons such as Robert Redford, with whom he worked on ‘Indecent Proposal’. He said: “It was daunting, but pretty exciting to be working with Robert Redford. It was a great experience, but definitely nervous doing scenes with him.”Featherstone-Witty asked him about how he chooses what projects to go for and whether he looked at money or the quality of the material. Making a direct reference to Featherstone-Witty’s own advice, Harrelson said: “A man I’ve recently come to admire told me ‘Find out what you love doing and how to get paid for it’.”He added: “I don’t do projects just for money. If you do that, your career isn’t going to last. Someone once told me, careers aren’t made by how many times you say yes, but how many times you say no. If money is the prevailing thing, then you’re lost.”Harrelson was also asked whether he would be returning to the stage, or if he felt his future was in television and film. He disclosed that he has been writing a comedy and that he might try and put it on in London and said: “I prefer theatre. I think it’s the best way to get psyched as an actor. Getting up on stage is so exciting.”Speaking after the event, Harrelson commented on his visit to LIPA, saying: “I love it here. It’s learning at its best. The students are so enthusiastic and love what they are doing. What better environment could they have? There’s a great vibe.”Woody Harrelson’s appearance was the latest of LIPA’s regular masterclasses and question and answer sessions, which give its students the opportunity to learn from successful figures across different areas of the performing arts industry. In the past, LIPA has hosted sessions with Sir Ian McKellan, Alan Rickman, Dionne Warwick, Dawn French, and Will Young alongside luminaries in senior roles that are about making performance possible (such as award-winning producers and lighting designers).LIPA is located in Paul McCartney’s old school, the Liverpool Institute for Boys, which underwent a multi-million-pound renovation to turn it into a state-of-the-art performing arts higher education institution. It was founded by Paul and Mark Featherstone-Witty and opened in 1995 with the aim of providing the best teaching and learning for people who want to pursue a lasting career in the arts and entertainment industry, whether as performers or those who make performance possible.For further information about LIPA please click here.Source:Liverpool Institute For Performing Artslast_img read more