Crusaders name squad for opening match

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Starting xv:1.    Wyatt Crocket2.    Quentin MacDonald3.    Ben Franks4.    Tom Donnelly5.    Samuel Whitelock6.    George Whitelock7.    Matt Todd8.    Kieran Read (capt)9.    Andy Ellis (vice capt)10. Tyler Bleyendaal11. Israel Dagg12. Ryan Crotty13. Robbie Fruean14. Sean Maitland15. Tom MarshallReplacements:1.    Corey Flynn2.    Owen Franks3.    Luke Romano4.    Luke Whitelock5.    Willie Heinz6.    Patrick Osborne7.    Adam Whitelock CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA – JUNE 30: Kieran Read during a Crusaders press conference at the Cullinan Hotel on June 30, 2011 in Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo by Ashley Vlotman/Gallo Images/Getty Images) Reid has been named captainThe Crusaders will open the Super Rugby season this Friday night when they meet the Blues in Auckland.  Coming off a successful pre-season where they knocked off the Highlanders, Hurricanes and Rebels, the Crusaders will be looking to continue their winning streak as the official season kicks off.Four changes have been made to the starting fifteen that met the Rebels last week:Wyatt Crockett comes into the number one jersey, and Ben Franks moves from loosehead prop to tighthead prop in place of brother Owen who will take the bench.Sam Whitelock and Tom Donnelly remain the starting locks but switch jerseys.  They will be backed up by Luke Romano on the bench. Robbie Fruean returns to centre and Ryan Crotty has recovered from a hamstring strain to start at second five.  Adam Whitelock and Tom Taylor who have filled this position in the last two warm-up games are both named in the reserves.last_img read more

Lions 2013: Match verdict: Lions 59-8 Barbarians

first_imgHONG KONG – JUNE 01: Stuart Hogg of the Lions moves past Dean Mumm during the match between the British & Irish Lions and the Barbarians at Hong Kong Stadium on June 1, 2013, Hong Kong. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Leading from the front: Centre Jamie Roberts shone as the Lions demolished the Barbarians in an eight-try rompBy Alan DymockIn a nutshellLIKE ANY first run out, the Lions took a while to get rolling with smart angles wasted and players not quite understanding each other, but once Warren Gatland’s opening XV starting putting passes to hand in the second-half they were able to burn off the Baabaas with consummate ease.Six different try-scorers – two of which had braces – tells you that there was danger everywhere. However, the lack of defensive fight after half-time has more to do with who the Lions were playing rather than how good they were. The Baabaas showed a few brief flashes, particularly through Joe Rokococo, whose step on Toby Faletau to set up Kahn Fotuali’i, rolled back the years, but ultimately they were not fit for the intensity of this match. Maybe, just maybe, their booze ban should have kicked in earlier.Key momentEven when things were not clicking in the first-half there were still a few stand-out individual performances. Such a performance came from Mike Phillips. Minutes into the second-half, the abrasive No 9 nailed any hopes of a Baabaas comeback firmly shut with his second try of the match. The ball came cleanly off the top of the lineout after a tapdown by Dan Lydiate and Phillips executed a neat dummy which opened a huge gouge in the Barbarian defence before pointing his way to the try line and leaping over in extravagant style. He followed this up in the second-half by driving his forwards on. He was setting down a marker that he didn’t want to relinquish the jersey he wore with distinction in 2009.Super seven: Justin Tipuric impressed in the looseStar Man: Jamie RobertsThe experts at Sky gave Mike Phillips the gong, but it was Jamie Roberts at inside-centre, the 2009 Lions tour Man of the Series, who calmly helped knit everything together. While other players buzzed and chittered round about him he delivered at a steady rate, running sharp lines and using the ball intelligently when taking heavy contact. Composure personified.Test WatchHotJustin Tipuric: While Roberts and Phillips dictated the pace, Tipuric galloped around the pitch like the world’s most faithful hound. A half-break; he was at the heel – nearly squeezing over after a Vunipola pop pass. A half-pitch dart; he was calling for the inside ball. The Lions captain has real competition, but then he already knows that. Barbarians: Tries: Fotuali’I Pens: DalyLions: Tries: Phillips 2, Cuthbert 2, O’Connell, Davies, Lydiate, Wyn Jones Cons: Farrell 3, Sexton 2 Pens: Farrell 3 Stuart Hogg: The full-back took a full-bore blast from Casey Laulala in the first five minutes, but after that he looked assured and never stopped cutting lines. More than once he put other players in space. Rich potential on the hard grounds Down Under.NotOwen Farrell: The fly-half was charged down seven minutes in and after a Schalk Brits haymaker grazed his chin and he retaliated with interest, he seemed shaken. He never really recovered in open play, despite assured kicking from the tee with 15 points. A mixed start from the young Saracen.Lion cub: Stuart Hogg improved as the game wore onStatsThe Lions carried 575 metres with the ball compared to 330 metres carried by the BarbariansThe Barbarians made 138 tackles, missing 25, a completion rate of 85%, compared to 75 made by the Lions and seven missed, a completion rate of 91%Alex Cuthbert carried furthest for the Lions with 112 metres, Mike Phillips was second with 80 metres and Toby Faletau third with 54 metres. For the Barbarians, Joe Rocokoco topped the list with 82 metres carried and full-back Jared Payne followed close behind with 76The Barbarians Sam Jones was the game’s top tackler with a remarkable 23. Richie Gray and Justin Tipuric were the Lions’ top tacklers with eight apieceScorerslast_img read more

Marcus Watson is ready for the Commonwealth Games

first_imgWatch Marcus and England 7s training in the gym! Click here to see the sevens schedule at the Commonwealth Games. Rugby World: How’s England’s Commonwealth Games prep been going so far?  Marcus Watson: It’s been good! We’ve done a few long days in training, to try and do the same hours as we’ll be doing at the tournament. So that means we’ve had a few 9pm training sessions, because our last pool game against Australia is scheduled for 9.48pm.We’re pretty used to playing in the early evenings when we go to the Sevens World Series events, but it’s not usually past 7pm or 8pm, so this is something new for us. Before each tournament we have a mini pre-sesaon, and when you’re playing games at different times during the day, you have to try and switch on and off as much as possible.Smiles better: Watson has recovered from a toe injury sustained at the London SevensRW: What else has been going on? MW: We went to Portugal for a week’s training. We were doing two sessions a day, one fitness and one contact. People who don’t watch sevens often assume we don’t have as much contact as 15s. A lot of our fitness sessions are done on the pitch, to test our skills under pressure. It’s game-specific fitness, designed to mirror what happens in a game as much as possible. Of course we have our gym sessions too, and sessions without rugby. RW: How did you get on at Sevens and the City?MW: It was good for me personally, because I tore a ligament in my toe in the final game of the London Sevens at Twickenham, so it was good to get a bit of game time now I’m back fit. Plus England got to have a final run out, and we beat Scotland 12-10 in the final.The synthetic pitch at Allianz Park felt a little different. It’s a fast track and is very bouncy, but I did come away with a few burns. Some boys have talked about sore joints after playing on it, but none of us had anything like that the next day.  RW: Have you been to a Commonwealth Games before? MW: No, this is my first! There’s been a great buzz in the run up to the tournament. Seeing the adverts on TV has been pretty cool, knowing I’ll be playing there. I’m looking forward to the opening ceremony too, and seeing the other athletes around.I have a friend who does triple jump but unfortunately he’s just missed out on the games. I’m looking forward to watching the athletics though, especially the 100m and 200m.Big bro little bro: Anthony (left) and Marcus also have a younger brother, CallumRW: Enough of the Commonwealth Games… can you tell us any stories about Anthony?! MW: I’ve got loads! A good one is that fact that he used to cry every time we played Fifa together on the playstation. He would always want to win, but we’re both competitive so I wouldn’t ever let him win just because he’s my younger brother!Where Anthony’s got to now, I’d like to be there too, so I’m very happy to see him where he is (in the England squad). It would be nice to play with him at some point too! We’ve only played together once or twice, in an A league game at London Irish, once where he played on the wing and I played full-back, and once he came on for me.We’ve got another brother as well, Callum, who’s in his last year at school at St George’s. He plays 15s and sevens, but there’s no pressure from me or Anthony or any of the family to go professional. He’s pretty sharp, he’s got good footwork and he’s probably the most aggressive one of the three of us!center_img England Sevens have settled into Glasgow and are cranking up their preparation for the Commonwealth Games. We caught up with Marcus Watson… Glasgow bound: Tom Mitchell (centre) will lead England at the Commonwealth Games last_img read more

Sam Burgess returns to Rugby League with immediate effect

first_img Sam Burgess has left Bath and England with immediate effect, with the Dewsbury-born player heading for Sydney and a welcome return to his Rugby League team, the South Sydney Rabbitohs in the NRL.With Bath’s owner Bruce Craig only yesterday at the EPCR launch, reiterating that Burgess would see out his three-year deal, the news will be met with consternation by many in Union, and glee in Rugby League where many felt Burgess had been harshly treated.The Rabbitohs confirmed the signing this evening, with Burgess saying: “I must thank Bath especially for granting my release to return home to my family who I have missed more than would have imagined. I want to thank everyone at England Rugby and Bath for some great memories over the last 12 months.”Burgess had made his debut for Bath on November 29, 2014, and less than a year later his departure will be seen as a high-profile failure. After making little impact as an inside-centre in his first few outings, Mike Ford has switched him to the back-row – where he saw his future – and in a handful of appearances at No 6, he showed enough promise to make many in the game feel he could prosper there. In his 17th and final appearance for Bath he put in his strongest showing in the Premiership final, where he notably drove Billy Vunipola backwards in trademark hit.Tentative steps: Sam Burgess was progress steadily as a blindside flankerEngland, however, had a different view on Burgess, and despite an inauspicious start with the Saxons in January, the 26-year-old was named in the 51-man training squad. Stuart Lancaster said he would be viewed as a No 12 for the Rugby World Cup, after he had performed well in training and shown clear leadership qualities.After making his debut against France, where again, he showed his defensive power in an eye-catching debut, he was controversially chosen in the 31-man England squad, with rumours Andy Farrell was a strong advocate of his, at the expense of Northampton’s Luther Burrell, who had been a key part of the England midfield during the previous 18 months. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight Checking-out: Barely a year after he signed for Bath, Sam Burgess has returned to Rugby League center_img Rugby union’s uneasy relationship with Rugby League will again be scrutinised after Sam Burgess leaves one year into a three-year contract with Bath Viewed as an impact sub for the tournament, Burgess ended up making three appearances. He came off the bench against Fiji, before being thrust into a starting position against Wales along with Brad Barritt when Jonathan Joseph was ruled out with a pectoral injury. While not at fault for the pivotal 28-25 loss, England’s lack of creativity and balance was criticised. He again came off the bench for his final Union appearance against Australia, where his final act was a reckless high-tackle on Michael Hooper, as England crashed out of the tournament before being omitted from the squad for Uruguay entirely.Comfort zone: Sam Burgess knows he will receive a warm welcome from friends and family at the RabbitohsRumours of his imminent departure have been circulating in recent weeks, and it appears Burgess will be the highest-profile league convert to fail to make the code switch successfully.There will fears that in the wake of England’s disastrous tournament, he will not be last of the casualties as the fallout is dissected on the back pages.last_img read more

Springbok legend Joost van der Westhuizen passes away aged 45

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Such a fall from grace hurt and the stress of the affair was blamed for him collapsing at a corporate event during the 2009 Lions series. After a chastening public mea culpa, he was slowly starting to rebuild his shattered personal life when MND was diagnosed. “Through my own experiences, I now accept you have to man up for your mistakes. When the going gets tough, you build character and when you’re riding high, you use it. You make the decisions in your life, so either deal with it or die. I’ve tackled life head on but I always say if you live in the past, it will ruin your future.”Known as a ruthless competitor and often perceived as arrogant, van der Westhuizen admits that MND has softened his character. “When you’re terminally ill, you see life in a different way. When you’re fit, you take time and your health for granted. It’s only when you lose it that you realise what you had. The disease has definitely changed me and, you know what, it’s made me a better person.”In focus: Van der Westhuizen had a life under media scrutinyAs the interview drifts inevitably towards rugby, a broad smile comes to van der Westhuizen’s face. So does he still take a keen interest? “Hell yeah, rugby will always be a big part of my life.”So what does he think of the current crop of Springboks? “I played under Heyneke Meyer as a coach and I know he is building something very special with SA rugby. In a year or two that side is going to be phenomenal and ready for a serious shot at the World Cup in 2015, mark my words.”England Rugby 2015 will mark the 20th anniversary of van der Westhuizen’s own nirvana, winning the World Cup in 1995. “In those days we were still amateurs and we just loved the game, so to be part of an event that changed our country made it unforgettable. It was comforting to know that through rugby we changed lives.”For those not au fait with the events at Ellis Park on 24 June 1995, South Africa – watched by Nelson Mandela – defeated a Jonah Lomu-inspired All Blacks 15-12 in the final to set off wild celebrations around the country. Van der Westhuizen was credited with a series of earth-shuddering tackles on the tournament’s bullocking superstar. “Jonah was a real handful back then but we’re now mates and he is a great guy, very down-to-earth. I have a lot of time for him.”Proud Bok: Joost signs autographs for fans at the 2003 Rugby World CupVan der Westhuizen had famously broken two ribs in the semi-final against France but decided to play through the pain barrier against New Zealand. Even now, he brushes off the injury. “I did what I had to do on the day. We were super-fit and were psychologically ready for Jonah and the mighty All Blacks. It was my job to act as a speedbump,” he chuckles.With the British & Irish Lions tour fast approaching, van der Westhuizen says he’ll be keeping a keen eye on Australia this summer, having been a key part of the last side to lose to the touring team, despite scoring a try in the second and third Tests in 1997. “Oh, don’t mention it,” he smiles. “I’ll always regret losing that Lions series. I’ve always saidthat we would have won that series if  we’d had a consistent goalkicker, but the reality is we didn’t and I’ll always feel blessed to have played against such a special team.”The Lions disappointment isn’t van der Westhuizen’s greatest source of rugby regret, however. That falls to the 1999 World Cup, when the Springboks went down 27-21 to Australia in the semi-finals, Wallaby fly-half Stephen Larkham scoring a memorable drop-goal in extra-time.“Before the game, our coach Nick Mallett said, ‘Whatever you do, keep the ball’. I remember late on, I threw a dummy on the 22 and made a line break with only Matt Burke to beat. Even now, I run it over in my mind. ‘What if I’d played my own game and chipped?’ I should have backed myself but for some reason Nick’s words stuck in my mind, so I took the contact and kept the ball and the chance went begging, leaving John Eales to go on and win the World Cup for Australia,” he says ruefully.Rivalry: Joost had an enduring battle with George Gregan and the WallabiesWith the interview coming to a close to allow van der Westhuizen to receive treatment for his weakening muscles, I ask him, when the time comes, what he would like his legacy to be? Springbok legend Joost van der Westhuizen has passed away leaving the rugby world in mourning, so as a tribute, here is an interview we ran with him in 2013 In 2013, Rugby World editor Owain Jones, sat down with Joost van der Westhuizen and talked to him about his life in rugby and his battle with Motor Neurone disease…In early 2011 the rugby world received news that was to stop it in its tracks. Joost van der Westhuizen, South African idol and one the greatest rugby players ever to grace the field, disclosed that he had a particularly aggressive form of motor neurone disease (MND), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The prognosis was grave. Sufferers with his condition are generally given between two and five years to live. Even for a fierce competitor renowned for not giving an inch in ten years at the game’s pinnacle, the news left the Pretoria-born scrum-half shell-shocked.Only months before, friends had thought he had gone a little overboard on the Castle lager when he started slurring his speech. But when he felt a loss of power challenging his friends to a playful arm wrestle, he decided action needed to be taken. After that fateful visit to the doctor, his world caved in.Nearly two years on, Rugby World caught up with van der Westhuizen in London as he visited the capital to raise funds for his charity at a star-studded dinner attended by the likes of Patrick Vieira, Shane Warne and Liz Hurley.To first see the man, so revered by the rugby public for his strength, skill and indomitable will to succeed, shuffling across the hotel lobby on a bitterly cold morning is humbling. Still tanned, having just flown in from Dubai, and wearing a thick navy blue overcoat, the 89-cap Springbok moved slowly, muscles having been weakened by ALS, but he made it across the 30-metre atrium unaided, before collapsing into a chair with an audible thump.Classic pose: Joost van der Westhuizen was rightly regarded as one of the greatsAfter only a few minutes in his company, however, any preconceptions of pity quickly dissipated. While the body is shutting down, the mind is alert and he is tackling ALS in much the same way as he faced opponents – with sheer bloody-mindedness and courage.So what does he remember of that day he was diagnosed? Van der Westhuizen, his words slurred, responds slowly but purposefully. “When the doctors told me I had MND, I’d never heard of it and did some research. I couldn’t believe it,” he says. “To be honest, it was an emotional roller-coaster and it took me about a year to fully come to terms with my condition.”Van der Westhuizen explains that once the anger and despair subsided, an acceptance began to emerge. “After a time, I came to the conclusion that life is not about the amount of years left but the amount of memories created. I’m determined not to spend the rest of my days in tears talking about my loss because it will make those close to me miserable. Likewise, if my friends and family are emotional all the time, it will just upset me.”Having young children whom he clearly adores – son Jordan, nine, and daughter Kylie, seven – made the news particularly heart-wrenching and he had to have a frank chat with his family, including heartbroken parents Mariaan and Gustav. “I sat them down and told them straight. ‘We don’t know what’s going to happen, let’s make memories while we can’, so we’re all having a lot of fun and I’m trying to spend as much time as I can with my kids. I can’t worry about the events I’m going to miss, like walking my daughter down the aisle or watching my son in sports day at school. I can only worry about the here and now.”Back with the boys: Joost celebrates the anniversary of the winning of the 1995 World CupOne project that has given him a raison d’être is his J9 Foundation, which helps other MND sufferers enjoy a better quality of life. “The foundation gives me a reason to get up in the morning. We focus on improving the emotional and financial welfare of MND sufferers through fund-raising. It’s only when you’ve been through it that you understand what the families are going through.Why do I do it? Simple – because it gives me pleasure.”As one of South Africa’s best-known sportsmen, van der Westhuizen has been genuinely moved by the backing givenby the rugby community, from the SARFU and his old Super Rugby team, the Blue Bulls, to individual players, led by the 1995 World Cup-winning team. “I’m still close to Francois (Pienaar) and the boys because of what we experienced, but to hear players like John Smit offering his support is very touching.”However, it’s the support shown outside the Rainbow Nation that has left him most overwhelmed. “It makes you realise what a big rugby family we are. My old sparring partners George Gregan, Justin Marshall and Agustín Pichotall asked if they could help and are now worldwide ambassadors for the J9 Foundation.”Titanic tussle: Joost was rated as one of the best No 9s of all timeSince retiring after the 2003 World Cup as the most-capped Springbok and top try-scorer, van der Westhuizen was living a gilded life, playing golf, attending dinners and building a successful broadcasting career, but his reputation took a hit in his homeland in 2009 when he was forced to admit, after an initial denial, that he had been caught on video in flagrante with another woman while his wife, South African TV personality Amor Vittone, was pregnant with their second child.center_img True hero: Joost faced his battle with MND with huge courage and humility Without pausing to think, the 42-year-old locks me with that famous icy stare and smiles. “I want to be remembered as someone who cared. Rugby has been good to me and if I die tomorrow, I’ll die a happy man.”Good luck, Joost, the rugby world is behind you.last_img read more

Six Nations Top Moments, The Inside Stories

first_imgFrance led at half-time 21-3, thanks to tries from No 8 Imanol Harinordoquy and scrum-half Dimitri Yachvili – who also kicked 14 points. But in the second, France had to repel a rampaging, resurgent England who scored tries through Ben Cohen and Josh Lewsey. France clung on to win 24-21.Magne does laugh when he is reminded that his body was knocked off that famous line during the game, by an enormous Phil Vickery hit. “Vickery is a strong guy, a very aggressive forward – I tried to go through him but I hit a brick wall!” he recalls.But he and his cohorts held fast, not saying much at all but led by a core of French heroes who had played together for a long time. Magne explains: “There were not a lot of words during the match. You just totally focus on the game-plan. You try to stay in the match. If you see a partner in difficulty, you help him. Raphaël Ibanñez was very good for this, as was Christophe Dominici and Fabien Pelous. These are guys I had played together with since we were 14 years old. We tried to take others with us, so it was not just words. We wanted to show what to do.Getting one back: Josh Lewsey breaks for England“It was a special time. We had a mix of experience, guys between 27 and 30. But we also had younger players like Imanol Harinordoquy and Freddie Michalak. A good mix, with young players who had enthusiasm. We had a good time together, not only on the pitch but through the week too.”Magne won four titles, two in the Five Nations and two in the Six Nations, with all of them Grand Slams. The former back-rower, who is now a pundit for Eurosport and a restaurateur in Hossegor, explains the magic of it all: “The Six Nations, when you play, something always smells different. Something always happens. It’s why we love the tournament.”Hands up!: Sergio Parisse and Italy celebrate in 2013Italy 23-18 France, Rome 2013The explosive Six Nations victory over France in 2013 had it’s moment, but Martin Castrogiovanni also fondly remembers the booze-up after Italy’s opening-round win in Rome that day.Castrogiovanni – who also played in 2011 when Italy defeated France 22-21 – had plenty of reasons to delight in the result. He scored a special, emotional try in 2013, and the team held off their continental neighbours right to the death.“When I scored, we started from our 22 – we played so many phases,” The former tighthead says. “I was lucky to find the ball about three metres out and I got over to score. We played a really beautiful way. It felt like all 15 players touched the ball before I scored.Try time: Martin Castrogiovanni scores against France in 2013“What I remember was that my dad was in the stands that day. He had come over from Argentina. He used to go and see my games when I played in Argentina but he wouldn’t come to all of my games for Italy, only a few.”The former Leicester Tigers pillar is one of the game’s characters. He admits that many games will pass him by and that he does not really watch rugby any more. The big moments, though, deserve colouring-in.“Sometimes things just go the way you want,” Castrogiovanni reasons. “You know that day you have, when everything goes well? I think the game against France was a day when things from the past came together. We’ had a few years with Nick Mallett (before Jacques Brunel took over) and he had done some things to help bring out our Latin emotions. I think that, and it was just a good time for us, and not so good for France.Everything clicked: Luciano Orquera in action that day“Sometimes you also wake up and everything you try comes off. That might be what happened for (Italy fly-half) Luciano Orquera then. It’s hard to explain. Maybe his wife didn’t break his balls too much that day?”And how was the mood as Tissot, the Official Timekeepers of the Six Nations, counted down the closing seconds? “We had to hold on. Sometimes when you are next to your friends, you are finally going to do something big, you put your body on the line. You have one step to do something really big, you take it.“At about 82 minutes we had three or four scrums. You don’t talk. You just close your eyes and get on with it! There is not much to say. You just think to yourself, ‘Let’s do it… Let’s do something special.’”The post-match drinks were well earned.Breaking away: Sam Warburton in action during Wales 30-3 EnglandWales 30-3 England, Cardiff 2013It was not meant to go like this. England were chasing a Grand Slam and Wales had only just got their title defence on track. They had a glimmer of winning the Six Nations again if they triumphed by seven points or more, but Wales were not the team being touted as potential victors as the English arrived in Wales for the decider.Yet, on 16 March 2013, Wales blew everyone away to take the Championship.At the vanguard of that Welsh onslaught was Richard Hibbard, a runaway toolchest with a blond explosion of hair. “To talk about that win you’ve gotta start from where we were,” Hibbard tells Rugby World. “We were on a losing streak (a fifth loss at home in a row, a record) when we lost to Ireland in the first game. The press were writing us off, the fans weren’t happy – which is understandable, losing at home. But it got us so tight as a group. Then we got the France result. And then the Scotland result.”Up in the air: Action from Wales v England in the 2013 Six NationsWhen it got to match day in Cardiff, the team were aware that they had a hope of Championship glory, but beating the English was all they were talking about. Little chit-chats were observed at breakfast, everyone trying to act ‘normal’. But on the way in to the stadium the noise grew.A few things stand out in the memory bank for Hibbard. “That game was so fast. I remember looking up at the clock, thinking that it must be close to the half, it had all gone so quick. Something like 12 minutes had gone and I thought: “Oh my god, how the hell am I going to last?” But you do.LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS“I can remember one scrum, it went down and we got the penalty. The front-row relieved the pressure. Dan Cole was on top of me, shaking me, he was so incensed. I knew that they were worried. And I remember putting a big shot on Joe Marler. Those are the things that stay with you.”In a second half of typically brilliant Six Nations madness, when the Welsh back-row led by Sam Warburton and Justin Tipuric tormented the English and Leigh Halfpenny and Dan Biggar kept knocking over kicks, Wales stretched their lead beyond any reasonable doubt.On top: Dan Cole has words with Richard HibbardNot for the first time, Hibbard was aware of the clock, run by Official Timekeepers Tissot, running down. What were those closing stages like? “Well I came off after 55 minutes and I headed straight down the tunnel,” Hibbard says. “I sat there and buried my head in my hands – I didn’t want to listen! I just wanted to beat them. We finished on a high and in the last 20 minutes we took control.“I understood (how big it was) when we went to collect the trophy. The stadium was still full and when they turned the lights out, it felt like they were right on top of you. Six Nations Top Moments, The Inside StoriesFrance 22-24 England, 2012In 2011, France knocked England out of the Rugby World Cup. By 2012, a new-look side, led by Stuart Lancaster, headed to France hoping to exact a little revenge in the Six Nations. Alex Corbisiero’s memories of that day are very clear.He says with a smile: “Lancaster asked Peter Winterbottom to give us a speech in the build-up to the game. I remember him saying he would give Thierry Dusautoir a bit of a dig if he was playing and caught him in a ruck!Feisty: Tom Croft confronts Aurelien Rougerie on the day“I remember seeing the crowd, the odd player warming up or starting to switch on. The pressure was on us. The build-up felt like a long time.“Once the game kicked off it was special. I can recall most of the game, it was just one of those days. I can remember the game being so tight, there was a lot of pressure coming from Nicolas Mas, who was doing so well at tighthead at the time.”England had a young team out, a new-look side that conceded hundreds of caps to their French counterparts. But that day they toughed it out to win 24-22, away from home. It was a defining moment for many careers and an instant classic that saw England clinch it by the skin of their teeth.Corbisiero looks back: “When Ben Foden scored in the first half I was swept up, there was relief. And then Tom Croft went sprinting through for a try near the end. We threw everything at it. I was hugging him under the sticks.In it together: Corbisiero and others celebrate with Croft“That try and the jumping around after, I think that was a moment that really brought us all together. For the collective, it was about believing and I’ll never forget that feeling. And maybe there was a bit of revenge for those of us who had lost to France in the 2011 World Cup.”With so many special Six Nations moments, ties can be decided as match clock, run by Official Timekeepers Tissot, ticks towards the conclusion. This match was no exception. Manu Tuilagi also scored for England, but they did not have things all their own way and had to grit their teeth in the second half.A late try by Wesley Fofana and an impossible conversion by Morgan Parra meant that there were two points in it at the death, with France hunting down the result.And then Francois Trinh-Duc had a drop-goal to win it… Only for the ball to fall short. England squeaked by.Tense finish: Wesley Fofana scores for FranceCorbisiero reflects: “After 2011, Lanny had faith in us to take hold of the culture. To put our demons to rest and prepare a new chapter. The thing I took away from that game was a bit of self-belief.“At the time everyone was doubting you – could you scrummage? Dylan Hartley and Dan Cole are very established now, but at that time they wondered about us against the French pack.“You learn so much more from being in those competitive games than you do from blowing people away. It’s trench warfare, sometimes. And this was the first time as a group we really did it together.”Special day: Dan Parks and his Scotland team-mates celebrate victory in DublinIreland 20-23 Scotland, Dublin 2010At the grand cathedral of Gaelic Football, Croke Park, Scotland turned up determined to cause mischief for the Irish in 2010.“The general backdrop for us is that our away record for Scotland had been poor,” No 8 Johnnie Beattie says of the need to cause an upset. They were not fancied and the Irish team ahead was full of stars.But Scotland pulled a 23-20 win out of the hat, helped by an early Beattie try and a nerveless penalty kick by Dan Parks on minute 78.On those key moments, Beattie says: “I don’t remember the build-up to my try at all. I remember running into Geordan Murphy out wide. And then all I remember is the feeling of my team-mates around me.Man of the hour: Dan Parks contemplates Six Nations victory“When it came to Parks’s kick, I couldn’t watch. I can’t really watch kicks, I never have. Normally I’d watch on the screen, but they didn’t have that so I had to watch him to see if it would go over. Not the kick, but his reaction after he kicked it. And I think I remember Parksy turning round and shooting pistols with his fingers!”Funny to look back on, but a brilliant moment in time. Beattie laughs as he recalls: “He is a complete clown, but he had knocked it over. And to see your mate do that, especially considering how much Dan had struggled with criticism in his career, was great.”There have been lean years for Scotland and this result came in the midst of a tough spell. This result could not be taken for granted, because so few predicted it. The Scottish players, understandably, wanted to take all of it in.Physical contest: Underdog Scotland knew they’d have it tough“I remember being on the pitch after that game, looking up at the faces and the Scottish fans in the crowd were going bananas,” Beattie says. “You find yourself wishing you could give that feeling to the people far away, those at home on the couch watching the game.“The only thing I can compare it too was in 2006 when I watched Scotland beat England. That was an amazing night, it was like a siege in Edinburgh.“To compare (the win in Ireland) with the last few years, that was part of a difficult period for Scotland. So we just wanted to savour that moment. We had worked so hard and that was a really celebrated Irish team.  So we just wanted to go around the ground, celebrate with the fans and each other and then enjoy the night in Dublin.”Pulling in the same direction: France after winning in 2004France 24-21 England, 2004“The Six Nations in 2004 were six months after the World Cup in Australia,” France’s Olivier Magne remembers. “And of course England beat us in that semi-finals. We felt that if we hadn’t lost to England then that we would have had a very good opportunity. So in 2004 that was our chance to say to the world that we are still a very good team.”Hi everyone: Magne with the trophyIn Paris in 2004, England turned up hoping to derail a French Grand Slam. According to back-rower Magne, France were maybe not the most confident, but with so much up for grabs and a shot at avenging their World Cup loss, they would put their bodies on the line. They had to. We take a look at some of the Top Moments in Six Nations history, with stories from inside those moments, shedding some light on what made them special. This is an advertising feature. This piece is written in Partnership with Tissot. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Perfect Paris: Manu Tuilagi celebrates his score against France in 2012 “The stars did align that day, but nothing outside the group had ever affected us going into it. Nothing else matters as much as the people that came through it.”What’s your #TopMoment moment of the 6 Nations? Share it on Tissot’s Facebook for a chance to win a Tissot watch.last_img read more

Antoine Dupont tests positive for Covid – Ten France players now ruled out

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS France scrum-half Antoine Dupont has been in superb form (Sportsfile/Getty Images) All players had tested negative at the start of last week but the French rugby federation (FFR) organised further rounds of testing following the news that head coach Fabien Galthie, forwards coach William Servat and another member of the back-room team had coronavirus earlier in the week.Related: Fabien Galthie tests positive for CovidNine of the ten players who have tested positive were in the match-day 23 that faced Ireland in the previous round of matches, so this will cause huge disruption to the squad.The FFR had announced a 31-player squad for the Scotland fixture on Sunday but have now had to make a further five changes due to the latest positive cases. Ten France players have dropped out of the squad to face Scotland after testing positive for Covid-19 Six Nations organisers are monitoring the situation, with the Testing Oversight Group (TOG) due to make a decision on Wednesday evening as to whether the Scotland match should go ahead as planned or be postponed. If there are further positive cases, it is likely it would be rearranged. Playing it on the weekend of 6-7 March is a possibility, although that creates problems with regards player release from clubs as those dates are not covered by Regulation Nine.A Six Nations statement read: “The TOG was advised by the French Rugby Union representative that all players who returned to the National Training Centre yesterday were tested on arrival and put in isolation pending results. All five players who tested positive have now left the training base.“The rest of the squad, all of whom tested negative, are training with restricted movement and no close contact for the next 48 hours. All players and staff will be tested every 24 hours.“The TOG will reconvene on Wednesday 24 February in the evening to review the situation. A decision on whether the France v Scotland fixture can go ahead will be made at that stage. Ensuring the health and safety of all players and staff is our number one priority. Should the decision be that the fixture cannot go ahead, the match will be rescheduled for the earliest possible date.“Six Nations would like to wish all affected players, coaches, and support team a speedy recovery.” Gaetan Barlot, Thierry Paiva, Cyril Cazeaux, Baptiste Pesenti and Thomas Ramos have been called up, but the squad are not due to start training until Wednesday subject to the results of the latest Covid-19 tests, which are now being carried out every 24 hours.France are currently top of the Six Nations table after wins over Italy and Ireland in the opening rounds. They are chasing their first Six Nations Grand Slam since 2010 and are due to play Scotland at the Stade de France on Sunday 28 February.In the latest round of testing on Monday night, all players and management returned negative tests. Voici la liste des 31 joueurs convoqués dans le groupe #XVdeFrance à partir de ce soir à Marcoussis afin de préparer le match contre l’Écosse !Suite à des tests complémentaires réalisés hier, Julien Marchand et Arthur Vincent ont été testés positifs à la Covid-19.#NeFaisonsXV— France Rugby (@FranceRugby) February 21, 2021 Antoine Dupont tests positive for CovidTen France players have now been ruled out of thier Six Nations match against Scotland after testing positive for Covid-19.France scrum-half Antoine Dupont was the first to return a positive test on Friday, two other players in the  squad returned positive tests on Saturday – wing Gabin Villiere and prop Mohamed Haouas – and another two on Sunday, Julien Marchand and Arthur Vincent.Then on Monday came the news that a further five players had tested positive, including captain Charles Ollivon. The others are Cyril Baille, Romain Taofifenua, Peato Mauvaka and Brice Dulin. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Video: What is ecumenism…and why does it matter?

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Tags Anglican Communion, Ecumenical & Interreligious, Video, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Eventscenter_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN WCC Assembly 2013 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Matthew DaviesPosted Nov 2, 2013 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Video: What is ecumenism…and why does it matter? Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC last_img read more

Archbishops recall commitment to pastoral care, friendship for all

first_img Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Posted Jan 29, 2014 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET [Lambeth Palace] The Archbishops of Canterbury and York have Jan. 29 written to all primates of the Anglican Communion, and to the Presidents of Nigeria and Uganda, recalling the commitment made by the Primates of the Anglican Communion to the pastoral support and care of everyone worldwide, regardless of sexual orientation.In their letter, the Archbishops recalled the words of the Communiqué issued in 2005 after a meeting of Primates from across the Communion in Dromantine.The text of the joint letter is as follows:“Dear Brothers and Sisters in ChristIn recent days, questions have been asked about the Church of England’s attitude to new legislation in several countries that penalises people with same-sex attraction. In answer to these questions, we have recalled the common mind of the Primates of the Anglican Communion, as expressed in the Dromantine Communiqué of 2005.The  Communiqué said:‘….we wish to make it quite clear that in our discussion and assessment of moral appropriateness of specific human behaviours, we continue unreservedly to be committed to the pastoral support and care of homosexual people.The victimisation or diminishment of human beings whose affections happen to be ordered towards people of the same sex is anathema to us. We assure homosexual people that they are children of God, loved and valued by Him and deserving the best we can give – pastoral care and friendship.’We hope that the pastoral care and friendship that the Communiqué described is accepted and acted upon in the name of the Lord Jesus.We call upon the leaders of churches in such places to demonstrate the love of Christ and the affirmation of which the Dromantine Communiqué speaks.”Yours in Christ,+Justin Cantuar   +Sentamu Eboracensis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tagscenter_img Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Human Sexuality Archbishop of Canterbury, Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Archbishops recall commitment to pastoral care, friendship for all Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Canada: Montreal diocese launches Inuit ministry

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Anglican Communion, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ethnic Ministries By Harvey ShepherdPosted Mar 5, 2015 Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Members of Annie Ittoshat’s first Montreal congregation gather for a group photo. Ittoshat is fifth from the left in a clerical collar; her husband, Noah, is next to her. Photo: Harvey Shepherd[Anglican Journal] “What we are doing is what God foreplanned,” the Rev. Annie Ittoshat from Nunavik in northern Quebec said as she launched a new ministry to Montreal’s Inuit community Feb. 22.Ittoshat led her first service, mostly in Inuktitut, before a congregation of more than 30 Inuit and their family and friends, in St. Paul’s Anglican Church, in the west-central suburb of Lachine. The St. Paul’s parish closed in November 2012. (A Seventh-Day Adventist congregation and other groups now rent the church or its hall.)She will also serve Montreal’s diverse population of Inuit in other ways, including visits to Inuit who come to the city for medical treatment, and participation in a modest eucharistic ministry, which Montreal clergy have offered for some time to these patients.She was also planning to make contact with other groups serving local Inuit, including drop-in centers related to the Anglican Diocese of Montreal.Along with patients and transients, Ittoshat also expects to serve staff working at health-care and other institutions, and Inuit living in Montreal for a variety of professional and other reasons.The Inuit population of Montreal has been estimated at about 1,000. Some are drawn by jobs, including positions in institutions that serve Inuit. Others are in the city for studies, for health care or to accompany family members who are patients. They are transient for various reasons or are driven from the North by social or housing problems.Ittoshat and her family are living in the rectory of St. Paul’s Church, situated in an area where there are several Inuit and a number of organizations serving them, partly because of the proximity of Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport.She was accompanied at the service by her husband, Noah, a miner at the Raglan base-metal mine in Nunavik, who has made arrangements to work on a rotating schedule that allows him to spend a couple of weeks at a time in Montreal, and a son and foster son, both named Peter. There are also two daughters, one living in Montreal and the other in the North.The service included vigorous, unaccompanied congregational singing of Inuktitut versions of standard hymns. The minister preached in an animated way, without notes, on one of the standard Lectionary readings of the day, from 1 Peter 3, which says Christ “suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God.”She said (in a brief summary in English) that this should relieve one of the needs for recurrent feelings of guilt. “We make a mistake, we ask [God] for forgiveness. If we ask for forgiveness, it is so.”The new minister and her husband, sons and one daughter arrived in Montreal from Kuujjuarapik, at the mouth of the Great Whale River.Ittoshat was accredited and ordained and served as a deacon and then priest in the North, and more recently, she studied for two years at Wycliffe College in Toronto, where she received a Master of Divinity degree in May, the first Inuk to do so.Services in Lachine will take place weekly, with Holy Communion on the last Sunday of the month.— Harvey Shepherd is editor of The Montreal Anglican, the newspaper of the Anglican diocese of Montreal.center_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canada: Montreal diocese launches Inuit ministry Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more