Online Retail Thriving: 8% Growth Expected This Holiday Season

first_imgYesterday we reviewed the past decade in online retailing. Today we look at some forward-looking statistics about e-commerce. In particular we analyze the upcoming holiday season and how online retailers can expect to fare. Amazon.com was founded in 1995, but it famously didn’t make its first annual profit until 2003. Those days of struggle for e-commerce vendors are long gone. In its State Of Retailing Online 2009 report, Forrester Research reported that the vast majority of Web retailers were not only profitable in 2008– in a recession – but also that their overall level of profitability grew. The e-commerce market is expanding, due to a combination of factors. One is that consumers are no longer afraid to buy things online, as they once were. Also brick-and-mortar businesses are migrating more of their operations online. We also have technology advances to thank: better recommendations technology, social media, the emergence of mobile commerce.E-commerce Continues to Grow, Despite EconomyE-commerce has ridden the ups and downs of the general economy over the past decade, but it has continued to grow throughout. In the State Of Retailing Online 2009 report, Forrester Research reported that retailers saw their Web divisions grow by 18% in 2008. Given that Forrester described 2008 as “one of the worst years ever” in retail, that’s significant growth in online retail activity. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Holiday Season Predicted to Grow 8%Online shopping has always been a seasonal market and there are promising signs for the upcoming holiday season. The latest comScore statistics show that toy web sites grew 9% in October, which comScore claimed was due to some parents getting in early for holiday gifts. The retail apparel segment also grew by 9% in October. Overall, Forrester Research predicts that online holiday retail sales (over November and December) will grow 8% this year to $44.7 billion. Brick-and-Mortar Stores a Success on the WebA noticeable trend over the past decade has been the slow but steady flight of ‘brick-and-mortar’ retail stores to the Web. In the early days of online retailing, Web operations were typically isolated from the main sales channels. But nowadays, Forrester notes that Web operations are a strategic part of the entire organization.Two recent stories from industry website Internet Retailer show how traditional retailers are not only adapting online, but thriving. Best Buy’s traffic has grown 18% over the past 12 months according to Nielsen Online. Meanwhile for the quarter ended October 31, 2009, Gap’s Web sales increased 4.9% to $298 million. The web accounted for 8.3% of sales at Gap in Q3 09, compared to 8.0% in Q3 2008. Forrester outlined a number of reasons why online channels are appealing during a “challenging” economy – including enabling consumers to find products online that they can’t find elsewhere, offering comparisons on product features and pricing, avoding holiday crowds and more. Related Posts Tags:#e-commerce#NYT#Trends#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… All of this data is very encouraging to online retailers. Even during a down economy, the Web has come through for most of them. Web entrepreneurs, if you’re looking for opportunities then look no further than online retailing!Photo credit: S?ndy richard macmanus Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

A New (Simpler?) Way to Control Flash with Microsoft Kinect

first_imgWhy You Love Online Quizzes Related Posts 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Tags:#hack#Hack of the Day klint finley We previously covered a method developed by BLITZ for controlling Flash and Canvas using Node.js. An organization has created what it hopes is a simpler way to control Flash-based interfaces using the Microsoft Kinect device. Open Exibits is an organization dedicated to creating open source interactive technology for students, museums and other educational organizations. It has built an open source module for controlling Flash with Kinect, and has demonstrated Kinect-control for Google Maps as well as some of Open Exhibits’ own projects.The module, still in alpha, is available here. Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

Are You Really Negotiating?

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now Countless.That’s exactly how many times I have been told by sales managers, sales leaders, and entrepreneurs that their salespeople need negotiating training And who couldn’t benefit from more training in negotiation (especially in this Disruptive Age, when prospects want to commoditize you and your offering)?But the negotiation problem isn’t that they could use more training. It’s that they need to start negotiating.It’s All About PiesThere are two parts to negotiating:  increasing the size of the pie and claiming part of it.Negotiation starts with increasing the size of the pie. When someone asks you to sharpen your pencil and you run and ask your sales manager to allow you to discount the price, you aren’t increasing the size of he pie. Instead, you’ve moved on to the claiming phase. More accurately, you’ve let the client determine that you are in the claiming phase.To negotiate, you have to work on making the pie as big as possible. I see salespeople play small, afraid to create the maximum value for their prospective clients because they fear that it will increase the risk and the time it takes to win (and sales leadership should be indicted here for allowing a short term focus to outweigh long term goals and value creation).This is the first stage. What can you do to make the pie bigger for both of you?Slicing the PieThe second phase of negotiating is dividing up the pie. Doling out the price concessions isn’t the right approach when it comes to claiming value.Negotiating means ensuring that you negotiate the profit margins your business needs to execute on the what you’ve sold. It means that you find an agreement that allows you to capture value in proportion to what you create. It means you help your client makes the right investment. This isn’t easy. It never has been.You need to push back and reiterate the value you create. You also need to help your buyer justify your pricing internally.If you’re going to improve your negotiating, you have to start by actually negotiating.QuestionsHow much do you work on increasing the size and value of the pie?How much do you work on confirming that the value you create is the value your client really needs from you?When you negotiate, do you claim a portion of the value you create, or do you really just negotiate the discount?What do you do to reiterate the value that you create?How do yo help your clients justify the investment you are asking them to make?last_img read more

Mens soccer SIUEdwardsville pounces on OSU Buckeyes drop to 37

OSU junior forward Nate Kohl (27) heads the ball in the second half against SIU-Edwardsville at Jesse Owns Memorial Stadium on Sept. 28. Credit: Michelle McDonnell | Lantern PhotographerFor the Ohio State men’s soccer team, home field has provided a much needed advantage.Coming into Wednesday’s game, OSU was riding a three-game home winning streak, averaging 2.67 goals per game while only allowing 0.67 goals per game over that stretch.The home cooking would sizzle out as the Buckeyes lost a back-and-forth contest against Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, 3-2, the first loss in their last four matches at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium.“It was a hard night,” OSU coach John Bluem said. “SIUE is struggling a little bit like we are so they were hungry to get a win. It felt like we were playing against 12 guys tonight.”The momentum was hard to grasp in the first period, as both teams seemed to score at will.Just eight minutes into the match, sophomore midfielder Abdi Mohamed floated a cross from the right side of the net to the left that allowed senior forward Danny Jensen to slide in and bury just past the goalkeeper, giving the Buckeyes an early 1-0 lead.It was the fourth goal of the season for Jensen, the Big Ten Offensive Player of the Week.The teams traded goals right up to the whistle. As the Buckeyes looked to take a 2-1 lead into halftime, the Cougars continued to fight and were rewarded for their efforts.In the last 10 seconds of the period, SIUE senior midfielder Gabe Christianson was able to get a header to fall off a corner kick from senior defender Andrew Kendall-Moullin, tying the game up at two a piece just before the break.  The score would remain at 2-2 for most of the second period, but the Cougars would deal the final blow.With just two minutes remaining, SIUE junior forward Devyn Jambga took a heel-kick pass at the top of the box and launched the ball into the back right corner, handing the Buckeyes their first home loss since Aug. 28.The Cougars brought a couple familiar faces to Columbus.Head coach Mario Sanchez played under Bluem when the two were at Fresno State.“[Sanchez] was one of the best players I have ever had and I have been coaching Division I soccer for a long time,” Bluem said. “When he played for me he was a coach on the field and he is a very good coach now. I have a ton of respect for him.”Along with Sanchez, the Cougars brought to town a transfer from Ohio State, sophomore midfielder Greg Solawa. Solawa made five starts for the Buckeyes a year ago, appearing in 11 games.“It’s always fun coming into the game knowing that you’re going to play against a guy you used to play with,” said Austin Bergstrom, OSU senior defender. “You always want to be the one on top when the last whistle blows. Unfortunately, he got the best of us tonight.”Solawa recorded one assist in the game against OSU.Despite scoring both of their goals in the first period, the Buckeyes were statistically better in the second period, outshooting the Cougars 7-4 after getting outshot 7-3 in the first period.“I was happy that we did create more opportunities in the second half,” Bluem said. “I think we were hurt by some critical mistakes and that has kind of been the story of the season this year. We punish ourselves by making stupid mistakes.”The Buckeyes will have to find a way to fix their mistakes before Sunday, when they take on Big Ten foe Michigan State at home. While just 3-7 overall on the season, the Scarlet and Gray could advance to 3-1 in conference play with a win over the Spartans.“We learn the most from our losses,” Bergstrom said. “I think we just got to come out on Sunday and know that we can’t have any letdowns. We’ve got to go forward having our heads up.” read more

Football Improvements in Ohio State cornerbacks a must heading into weekend against

Ohio State redshirt junior cornerback Denzel Ward prepares for a play during the Buckeyes’ season-opening 49-21 win over Indiana on Aug. 31 in Bloomington, Indiana. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorIndiana quarterback Richard Lagow made it clear early that the Hoosiers’ offensive game plan was to attack an Ohio State secondary that lost both starting cornerbacks and a starting safety from a season ago.For the most part, that plan proved effective as Lagow finished the game 40-for-65 in pass attempts with 410 passing yards, three touchdowns and two interceptions, even though Indiana lost 49-21.“Our defense was exposed big time in the first half. Our pass defense was awful,” Meyer said Thursday. “It was not complicated, they were just picking on the corners.”Playing against a quarterback in Baker Mayfield of Oklahoma on Saturday, Ohio State’s secondary is going to be in for another major challenge. Mayfield finished his team’s season opener 19-for-20 with 329 passing yards and three touchdown passes en route to a 56-7 beatdown of University of Texas-El Paso.Defensive coordinator Greg Schiano said Monday that defending against an athlete like Mayfield could provide his secondary with issues, if it doesn’t step up its game from this past weekend.“[Mayfield]’s got incredible arm strength, and when I say incredible, he can really throw the ball down the field,” Schiano said. “He is most anxious when he has a little bit of space and he can let receivers down the field because he has a strong-enough arm to go roll over there and throw it all the way back over there. And you saw it in our game, he had a touchdown on us last year.”In its matchup against another gifted quarterback in Lagow, Ohio State seemed to get off to a slow start.Through the first half of the game, Lagow showed no hesitation, frequently passing into what had been a hyped up secondary for Ohio State. He targeted Denzel Ward — the third man in the three-man cornerback rotation last season — 10 times during the half and managed to complete three of those passes for a total of 29 yards and a touchdown, the first Ward had ever surrendered.By the time the half was over, Indiana gained at least 15 passing yards on eight occasions. Of those, five were allowed by the fresh-faced cornerbacks.“We gave up three plays of plus-25 yards or more. You can’t do that,” Schiano said. “They made some plays on us. In looking at it, it was a group of guys that have played some, but haven’t started, haven’t been in that role.”But the inexperience was not the only cause for struggles among the corners.Indiana’s leading receiver for the game, the 6-foot-4, 220-pound Simmie Cobbs, trounced all over Ward and Kendall Sheffield — his two primary defenders — in the first half. He had no trouble leaping over the 5-foot-10 Ward and six-foot Sheffield, making acrobatic catches and back-shoulder fades as though it were nothing more than practice on his way to 98 receiving yards and a touchdown on just seven first-half receptions. He finished the game with 149 receiving yards with 11 receptions.Meyer said the difference in height can put a corner at a disadvantage, but that the gap should not be enough of an obstacle to allow for blown coverage.“Everyone wants a 6-foot-1 corner. There’s not many of them out there. We had Eli [Apple], Marshon [Lattimore] and Gareon [Conley] were all the long corners. Denzel, he’s not that small, but you have to be exceptional in technique,” Meyer said. “Obviously the vertical jump, to be able to knock a ball out, we practice the heck out of that. That’s much more difficult. Can be done, though.”And it seemed that in the second half, the gap in height seemed to have much less of an impact on the corners. With 10:11 remaining in the game, Lagow again looked Ward’s way to another 6-foot-4 receiver, Donovan Hale, and attempted to complete what would have been a 20-yard pass. But this time, Ward won the battle and came down with an interception.The improved play in the second half came not just from Ward, but also from the rest of the secondary. The unit held Lagow to just 151 second-half passing yards and one touchdown after he tallied 286 passing yards and two touchdowns through the air in the first half.“I was concerned a little bit during the first half, but I was pleased the way they rebounded in the second half,” Schiano said. “Hopefully they’ve got some experience under their belt now and we can move forward.”Schiano added that with the pressure of the position of cornerback, the unit will need to continue to exhibit a similar performance level moving forward if it is going to live up to the lofty standard set at Ohio State.“Around here, the standard is you don’t allow catches,” Schiano said. “When you play corner, it’s not the five you made that stick out, it’s the two you missed. And that’s the position. If you don’t like it, go play something else.” read more