Creating a sales and service culture

first_imgA sales and service culture is an environment in which everybody at a financial institution is motivated and well-equipped to present products to borrowers that benefit them on an individual level. The institution moves beyond viewing its customers transactionally and encourages its employees to treat all product offerings as personalized opportunities to better serve the people they engage.Products Customers Actually NeedInstead of blindly offering customers the ‘product of the month,’ members of a sales and service culture recognize the importance of individual relationships at the point of sale. All stakeholders at the financial institution are involved in creating relationships, asking questions, finding out what’s important to the customers, and identifying what’s going on in their lives. This allows institutions to encourage their staff to be relationship-oriented instead of forcing them into a sales role, which is a critical distinction for many loan officers at financial institutions. When employees understand that they can offer education and products that benefit their customers in meaningful ways, they are more likely to offer them to everyone.Results Financial Institutions WantFinancial institutions are often reluctant to incorporate non-interest income products into their portfolios out of fear that becoming sales-oriented will drive borrowers away. However, when a sales and service culture becomes a top-down part of an institution’s DNA, offering additional products becomes part of that institution’s commitment to delivering exceptional customer service. Instead of viewing extended coverage products as one-size-fits-all solutions aimed at increasing revenue, financial institutions can tailor their offerings to the individual customer, which leads to improved relationships and increased revenue opportunities. In a true sales and service culture, offering products is the norm, not an anomaly—and neither the loan officers nor the customers are surprised by the open conversation about what products would benefit the borrower. continue reading » 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more