No let up in new car market as August registrations rise

No let up in new car market, as August registrations riseSo far in 2002, total new car registrations have risen 7.3 per cent to 1,630,575 units Sales to private buyers are up 9.3 per cent, from 730,871 to 798,687 units The August market was up 12.8 per cent to 87,245 units, driven by private buyers Commenting on the figures, SMMT chief executive Christopher Macgowan said, ‘The new car market continues to deliver excellent results this year and August was yet another strong month. The momentum of the last 18 months has not cooled and last year’s record total of 2.46 million cars looks set to topple.‘Of course August is really an aperitif for the September market. With the change to the registration plate, September is a key month for sales and we fully expect more than 400,000 new cars to leave UK showrooms’, he added. Notes to editors: Private buyer growth throughout 2002 was reflected in a robust August market. Registrations to private buyers in August rose 29 per cent to 41,456 units. January to December figures for new car sales in 1992 hit 1.59 million units. Ten years later, the market has already beaten that total. During the first eight months of 2002, new car registrations have topped 1.63 million cars. The 2002 year-end forecast is for a record 2.51 million units. Registrations of diesel cars rose 45 per cent last month to 20,524 units compared to 14,165 in August 2001. So far this year, total diesel sales hit 371,238 units up from 249,880 cars from January to August in 2001. August 2002 The attached tables show the registration figures for Great Britain, Northern Ireland, The Isle of Man and the Channel Islands in detail. Top performers by range and UK penetration figures are also listed. Providing the SMMT is acknowledged as the source of this information, the figures may be quoted. Substantial reproduction needs specific approval by the SMMT. DownloadClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) read more